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Chapter 1: James Johnson and Harriet Emaline Lamb (Parents of Hazel Johnson)

Chapter 1 Abbreviated Family Group Records
Parents: Jens Jørgensen  1820-1891 / Marie Larsdatter  1830-1886  Married    1850
Children:
1
F      Ellen Kirstine Jensdatter  1850-1850
2 M     Lars Niels Jensen  1852-1856
3 F      Ellen Kirstine Jensdatter  1854-1856
4 F      Mary Johnson  1857-1875  Married:  1872  to John Halling
5 M     James Johnson  1859-1940  Married:  1880 to  Harriet Emaline Lamb
6 F      Laura Georgina Johnson  1862-1913  Married:  1877  to Hans Peter Hansen
7 M     Joseph Johnson  1865-1940  Married:  1884 to  Olive Rosann Lamb;  Married: 1909 to  Nellie Elizabeth Thomas
8 F      Sarah Kathrine Johnson  1867-1872
9 M     Lorenzo Johnson  1871-1937  Married:  1891 to  Mary Elizabeth Hansen
10 F    Elizabeth Jane Johnson  1875-1942  Married:  1892 to  David Samuel Jensen

 

Family Group Record

Parents: Suel Lamb  1833-1913 / Elizabeth Zimmerman  1831-1911  Married  1854
Children:
1 F      Elizabeth Victorine Lamb  1855-1882   Married: 1873 to  William Hyde
2 F      Julia Ann Lamb  1857-1929  Married:  1877 to  Joseph Benson Roper
3 F      Abigail Susan Lamb  1860-1941   Married: 1878 to  William Hawkes
4 F      Harriet Emaline Lamb  1862-1933   Married:  1880 to  James Johnson
5 F      Olive Rosann Lamb  1864-1907   Married:  1884 to  Joseph Johnson
6 M     Suel Erastus Lamb  1866-1954  Married:  1888 to  Phebe Ann Thurston
7 F      Margaret Elsie Lamb  1869-1909    Married:  1887 to  Joseph Truman Sharp
8 F      Myra Christina Lamb  1871-1905   Married:  1889 to  Joseph Benjamin Daines
9 M     George Zimmerman Lamb  1873-1949   Married: 1894 to  Jane Elizabeth Grant
10 M   John James Lamb  1875-1961  Married:  1896 to  Tracy Thurston

Family Group Record

Parents: James Johnson  1859-1940 / Harriet Emaline Lamb  1862-1933   Married  1880
Children:
1 M     James Erastus Johnson  1881-1977  Married: 1904 to Annie Agnes Lewis
2 M     Laurence Johnson  1883-1960   Married:  1907 to  Mary Ann Stephens
3 F      Edna Johnson  1886-1966   Married: 1909  to  Harrison Reuben Merrill
4 M     Louis Johnson  1888-1979   Married:  1914 to  Dorothy Amanda Barger
5 M     Johnson  1891-1891
6 M     Gloyd Johnson  1892-1892
7 M     Floyd Johnson  1892-1951    Married:  1918 to  Clara Kern
8 M     Howard Johnson  1895-1986   Married:  1918 to Selma Kern
9 F      Harriet Johnson  1897-1982    Married:   1916  to  Thomas Kidd Greaves
10 F    Hazel Johnson  1899-1993   Married:  1921 to  Marcus Joy Christensen
11 M   Orene Lamb Johnson  1904-1963    Married:  1929 to Glenna Cordingly

History compiled by Joyce Johnson Seely, great granddaughter, 2004; edited by Beth Breinholt and Joy Stubbs, great granddaughters, 2010

James Johnson 1859-1940

Brigham City, Utah
James Johnson was born on the 20th of November, 1859, in Brigham City, Utah, to Jens and Maria Jorgensen.  (He was known throughout most of his life as Jim, which is how he is often identified in this history.) Jim’s mother and father were of pioneer stock.  They were converted to the gospel in Denmark in 1854 and came to America, landing in New York City on the 18th of February 1856.  When they arrived in the new land, the wagon and team they had paid for could not be found.  So they purchased a handcart and after crossing the plains, arrived in Utah in July of 1857.  They settled in Brigham City, Utah, north of Salt Lake City.  There were a lot of Scandinavian settlers in this area. (See chapter on Jens and Marie Jørgensen in this book for more detail.)

When Jens and Maria joined the church in Denmark, they were the parents of three children.  One child died in Denmark and is buried there. The second child died on the ship and third died shortly after they arrived in the United States. After they arrived in Brigham City, baby Mary was born. (Eventually Mary got married and had a baby, but both she and the baby died young.) Jim was the second child born in Brigham City, and he became the oldest living son of the family. He said that by the time he was born, the family was never known as Jorgensen, but as Johnson, and he could not remember his father ever being known as Jorgensen. (The name Jorgensen was put on his parents’ original grave stone because the next oldest sister [Laura Georgina] thought they should have it that way; however, a new a modern stone has replaced it and their grave is now marked James and Mary Johnson. Also, on an early church record of Brigham City, they are listed as Jorgensen.) They may have rejected their Danish name and language partly because of the way they were treated in Demark after they joined the church.  The Lutherans (state church) didn’t want the people to join the church and move to Utah, but a lot of them did.  So here in the United States, they always spoke English in their home, and the children did not learn Danish. Of course it was broken English and they were subjected to a lot of ridicule by others.

Being the oldest boy Jim had to help a lot on the farm as his father was crippled. When he was about nine or ten he had a thriving business. He would herd cows along the shores of the Great Salt Lake. For a certain amount per head, he would gather the neighbor’s cows after milking time in the morning and tend them all day.  Then when the sun was setting on the lake he would gather the cows together and deliver them to their respective owners in time for the evening milking. He was very much alone as far as people were concerned, very much in company as far as cows were concerned.

Shortly before he died (September 1940) Jim related the following incident to his granddaughter, Verna Greaves:

A large majority of the people around that section of the country had agriculture and cattle raising as their occupation.  You can readily see that this would provide an excellent field for an ambitious, swash-buckling cattle rustler. It was really an adventurous work and provided a great source of revenue for those who were proficient at it.  There was really only one difficulty involved that really meant anything–the cattle owners objected.

A sheriff from Brigham and a posse were instructed by the worthy members of the community to bring two overly-ambitious rustlers into custody. You understand they were considered dangerous.  These very bad men were soon caught and taken to the jail. It was noised around that a mob was going to take care of them in the usual manner and I wanted to see the fun. I hurried three or four miles and arrived at the scene in time to see the irate citizens drag the men from the jail, take them to a nearby tree and string them up by the neck. This picture has always been vivid in my memory.

Because more people were moving into Salt Lake Valley, the Saints started branching out and as good homesteading land was offered in Cache Valley, many of these people moved there. Jim’s father was one of these and he chose Hyde Park as the place to live. Cache Valley was also known as Hidden Valley.

Move to Hyde Park, Utah
When they moved, Jim, who was twelve, and his brother Joseph, who was six, were left to drive all their cattle over the mountains into Cache Valley.  At that time there were no roads nor was the land fenced in this area.  The two little boys drove the cattle through the mountains crossing the passes they thought would be the easiest to get through.  It took several days to make the journey and at night some kind farmers along the way would give them something to eat and a place to sleep.  This was a heavy responsibility for two little boys so young, but they were capable of doing it.

Jim had very little schooling in Brigham City and even less in Hyde Park. Since his father was crippled and Jim was the eldest living son in the family, he had the responsibility of running the farm.  When he did go to school it was only in the dead of winter when there was little farm work to be done. He had about the equivalent of a fourth grade education. However in his later years, he seemed to be a well educated man.

Work on the Railroad
When Jim was only nineteen years old he took his first contract for building a railroad.  In order to get the road beds ready in a hurry the contracts would be released one mile at a time to one group. Jim contracted for this, building for about three years, working mile by mile before returning to Hyde Park where he and Harriet planned to marry.

Jim and Harriet met growing up together in Hyde Park. He always said Harriet was the only girl he had ever gone with. Although they were both busy with a great deal of work to do, he and Harriet had some beautiful times together.

Harriet Emaline Lamb 1862-1933

Lehi, Utah
Harriet Emaline Lamb was born 23 February 1862 in Lehi, Utah County, Utah, to Suel and Elizabeth Zimmerman Lamb. Harriet’s mother and father were of pioneer stock.  In her journal, Elizabeth writes: “In 1846 I became acquainted with Suel Lamb in Garden Grove.  The first time I ever saw him, he came to our house one Sunday in company with some other young folks.” They came across the plains in separate wagon trains and settled in Lehi, Utah, where they were married. They moved to Hyde Park, Utah when Harriet was 2 years old.

Growing up in Hyde Park
Harriet’s sister Susan (always called Susie) was two years older than she was, and they were very good friends and played and worked together most of the time.  Her mother even made them dresses alike.  They were also the oldest girls, so they were good farm hands.  Her father took up homesteading near the Benson Ward and they lived there during the summer time.  They took milk cows on shares and made butter to sell. Harriet was a good “cow milker” so she did most of the milking and the churning of butter.

Harriet and Susie learned to swim in a big canal at Benson Place and were very good swimmers. This came to Harriet’s aid at one time when her own daughter, Edna, nearly drowned. She rushed into the water and saved her.

There was a lady who lived near Benson Place, and all the neighborhood kids were afraid of her. Since Harriet and her siblings had to sleep in the hay loft, they would pull the ladder up at night in fear that she might come around.

Two years before she was married, Harriet was the chaperone for her sister Susie, who married William Hawkes in the Endowment House. After the wedding, they all traveled on to Lehi and visited Susie and Harriet’s relatives, the Zimmermans and the Lambs, and then went on to the Provo bench to visit James Lamb before returning to Hyde Park. This trip took two weeks.

Jim and Harriet

Married Life Begins
Jim and Harriet made a nice looking couple. She was 5’3” with blue eyes and brown hair. Jim was about 9 inches taller at 6 feet. He also had blue eyes and a sandy complexion and hair. They were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah on the 23rd of December 1880 by Daniel H. Wells. Since they had to go to Salt Lake City in a covered wagon, Harriet took her sister Olive along for a chaperone.  They had to camp out along the way so the girls slept in the wagon and the men slept under it.

Harriet had a very dear girl friend who was also a friend of Jim. When they were going to be married, this friend wanted to marry him too because she liked both Jim and Harriet and wanted to be with them. She was very nice and even offered to be the second wife. Jim liked her but he felt he could only handle one at a time so he was forced to gently refuse her.

After Jim and Harriet were married, Jim’s first work was a contract to build on the Great Northern Railroad in Montana. He was the supervisor of approximately fifty men, and Harriet cooked for the crew. They worked together in Montana for a while, and then she decided to go back to Hyde Park with her baby, Jim. When she arrived at Hyde Park, she had to carry her baby and her luggage to her house, one-half mile away.

Two children were born to them in Hyde Park:
1. James Erastus Johnson, 25 September 1881
2. Laurence Johnson, 5 November 1883.

While Jim was working in Montana, he found a moon stone and had it polished and mounted and then wore it on his watch chain. When he stopped using that watch, he gave the stone to Roma, his granddaughter, and she wore it as a necklace.

Their Montana headquarters were near Missoula, Montana and Jim and Harriet became acquainted with the owner of a large ranch there. He had never married and became very attached to them as they met often in buying their eggs, milk and butter from the ranch. When they had finished their work with the railroad, he asked them to stay and work for him, promising them that at his death the place would be theirs. However Jim and Harriet longed to return to the Cache Valley and the people there.

Move to Idaho
In July of 1884, according to the Preston, Idaho LDS ward records, James and Harriet moved just across the Utah-Idaho border to Preston, along with William and Susie Hawkes. Joseph Johnson and Joseph Roper followed in 1885. These two brothers and two brothers-in-law married four of the Lamb sisters from Hyde Park and they all came to Preston about the same time. William built a two-room log house with a shanty.  The shanty was used for a kitchen and all the cooking was done here. The house had an upstairs with a ladder outside leading up to it. Jim and Harriet lived in one of the two rooms of William and Susie Hawkes’ home for a while until their house was built. At that time, Preston was almost a barren country. Here they had to endure the many hardships of pioneers in a new country. People were just starting to settle in Preston and homesteading in outlying areas.

Besides young Jim and Laurence, a third child was born to Jim and Harriet:
3. Edna Johnson, 19 May 1886.  Harriet went to be with her mother so the baby was actually born in Hyde Park.

According to Idaho land records, Jim bought 32 acres from Tom Heller in Preston City proper for $500. The deed was recorded in 1887 in Oneida County.  This land was divided among the four men and their wives. In 1895, this was recorded as Jim selling the land to the others for $1.  Around this time also, all four families homesteaded farms north of the city.  Other siblings of Jim and Harriet also moved to the Preston area around the turn of the century, some in the city and some with homesteaded farms nearby.

Homesteading in Winder—Johnson’s Army
The four men, Jim and Joe Johnson and their brothers-in-law, William Hawkes and Joe Roper, formed a partnership and went into business together.  They homesteaded a farm in the Poverty Flat area that is now known as Winder, did custom threshing for other farmers and also owned and operated a sawmill up Birch Creek, about seventeen miles out of Preston.  They became known as “Johnson’s Army.” At first they had two shanties on their homestead.  One belonged to William Hawkes and the other to Joseph Johnson.  After they improved the land, they moved a log cabin in and this is where they did the cooking.  There was granary on one side to store the wheat until they could haul it to the train, and on the other side of the driveway was the house.

They had an old cellar in the hollow and in the springtime the water would get into it.  They stored root vegetables in the cellar.

One of the men would go with the children and work on the homestead, and the women would go with them to cook.  Usually Joseph Johnson would “batch” it most of the year.  As the children got older, they were expected to help with the work on the homestead.

They had to drive the stock and cattle to the river for water.  On the homestead they dug a well to get water.  It was 65 feet deep and the water was not good to drink.  The horses would hardly drink it.  A neighbor, Isaac Bright, dug a well and he seemed to have been quite successful in getting a little good water, so they went there to get the water for the horses that they used for the header.  They filled barrels for drinking water at a well that had fairly good water by driving about a mile.

The first thing they did on the homestead was clear the sage brush from the land and then rake it.  Even the children helped by working along with the adults.  The sage rake that they used was homemade.  They would plow the sage to loosen the roots, then they used the sage rake to gather it up. The rake took six horses to pull.

Steam Engine
The “army” worked well together as they homesteaded and farmed their land.  James and Joseph Johnson were joined by their youngest brother, Lorenzo and the brothers-in-law in owning one of the first steam engines in the area. They did much of the mowing and binding grain in those days on other farms as well as their own.

The knotter on the binder didn’t always work and would kick out unbound bundles. The men refused to waste the bundles so they would would stop the horses and use some straw to tie them together.

Before they owned the steam engine, they used horses when the threshing was done.  They used twelve horses to thresh grain with the old horse-powered machine.  The twelve head of horses would go around and around in a circle on a track, driving the gears of the threshing machine.  When they got the steam engine in 1904 it took four men to operate the bundles. Two fed the machine by hand and two men cut the bands as they threshed the bundles.  The engine had a water tank and the boys would go to a stream and pump water in the tank for the engine. One year at Winder they had to go to Battle Creek for the water, a distance of about five miles. They did this until sometime in late December. They also worked together building ditches and helping construct the Mink Creek canal.

They always had good horses and kept them well groomed. The horses were very important to their work and also well-loved.  William Hawkes owned and cared for the horses.  To make them shine after they were curried, he wiped them with a coal-oil rag.

Preston, Idaho
At this time Preston had wooden sidewalks and no graveled roads.  In 1914 there were still only 4 cars in Preston. Jim owned one of them. They would help plow the grade for the roads after the winter and rainstorms and others would follow and scrape the dirt down to a grade.  The roads were very muddy during the spring and rainy weather, so this was a good occupation for them.  The buggies and wagons that were used at that time were often bogged down in the mud.

There were only two school rooms and two teachers in early Preston. Oneida Stake Academy was the church school. Students could take any grade they wanted and when it was good weather in the spring, the farmboys left school to go help on the farm.

The children also found time to play. They   had made a swimming pool on a branch of the Bear River just a few miles out of Preston where everyone learned how to swim. They would start when they were about seven, and by the time they were grown up, they could all swim like ducks.

Louis writes about the trade in Preston.

I hardly ever saw money, there was so little of it. We would  take a little grain, or sell some pigs, and buy what was called scrips.  Some of the places had coins made out of brass, while others had paper. This we would keep for money. If we didn’t want to buy too much, Mother would send us to town with a few eggs to buy groceries. Saturday was “trade day” with the people around Preston. This day everyone would bring their produce to town and trade with each other. You could take one egg and trade it for an “egg’s worth of candy.” …We would only go to town once a week and that was on Saturday, unless it was necesary to go on other times.

There were only two little mercantile stores in Preston. On the way to school, instead of going on the sidewalks, we would cut corners and crawl throught the fences to get to school. We called this “going through lots.” There were only houses part way around the blocks and there were no regular paths.

William Hawkes, Jr. (son of Susie Lamb Hawkes) tells about his mother and aunts trading work as well as goods in town.

In the early days, the W.C. Parkinson store and J.C. Smith store used to take in live chickens. Mother, Aunt Harriet, Olive and Julia would clean them and sometimes they would clean as many as 40 to 50 chickens a day. When people would trade in butter for groceries, they worked over the butter and molded it for the stores….

People paid their tithing in kind. There was a tithing yard which had a tithing granary and we would haul hay there. Every 10th load of hay would go down for tithing. We would take one-tenth of the grain down there for tithing. Eggs and butter were also used to pay for tithing

Everyday Chores
The Lamb sisters worked closely together just as their husbands did.  Five of them built houses next to each other on a quarter of a block each in Preston. (See illustration at right.) They had their barns with horses and livestock right there at the house.

While one of the wives would go to the homestead in the summer to cook, the other would stay in Preston.  They would raise gardens and food was preserved for the winter.  Besides a garden, they would have berries of every kind and apple trees.  They had a root cellar where they could keep root vegetables, like potatoes, carrots and beets, and other vegetables that would store, such a squashes and cabbage or other produce that need shelter from the heat or cold.  Some would also keep homemade root beer in the root cellar, and it was always very cold.

They would keep cows for milk, butter, cream and meat.  They had chickens for eggs and meat.  Also pigs were raised for meat and lard.  The fat was rendered into lard and put away to be used for cooking and also for making soap.  They would cook sausage patties and put them in a crock and cover them with the grease and they would keep in the root cellar.

Their washing machine had a lever that had to be pulled back and forth to wash the clothes, and a wringer that was turned by hand.  They would put the clothes up to the wringer with one hand and turn the wringer with the other.  This was an improvement over the washboard and tub.  The clothes were always hung out on clotheslines to dry.

To get the water soft enough to do the wash in, wood ashes were sprinkled into the boiling water and then allowed to settle to the bottom. This made lye water which softened the water and supplemented the rain and melted snow used for washing. Women made their own starch with potatoes. They washed, grated and then washed the potatoes again, letting the starch settle to the bottom. This starch was dried and used to starch their clothes.

Birch Creek
In the wintertime after all the harvesting was finished, Jim and his brothers Joseph and Lorenzo and Joseph Roper would take the steam engine up to their saw mill in Birch Creek, six miles up the canyon southwest of Mink Creek.  It was the first saw mill in this part of the country, a shingle mill. It was called the “Johnson Brothers Sawmill.”

These shingles had to be put in a bunch, and the “buncher” would count the number of shingles in the bunch.  They bound the shingles by putting a pole in a cross band and pulling the band down tight and fastening it.  The women would take turns spending the winter there and cooking for the crew.  They usually took a cow for fresh milk and there was a little store close by in Mink Creek for supplies.

Lorenzo Johnson’s Sawmill Accident
Hattie Johnson Greaves continues with an account of an accident that happened at the sawmill:

It seems that my mind is dwelling on the things that happened while my folks had the sawmill in Birch Creek. Truly they were frontier times.  When Father’s brother Lorenzo was about twenty he stayed at the mill to run the saw while Father came to town for the 24th of July.  While he was greasing the works Mr. McQueen who was the engineer started up the saw and it cut almost thru Uncle Ren’s leg.  They brought him to town in a wagon.  He bled every bit of the way and when they got him home he was almost gone.  However, they got a doctor and he trimmed up the wound and sewed it up.  But he was so weak from shock and loss of blood that it appeared he was dead.  In fact, the doctor said, “He is gone.”  My Aunt Olive, who was always very emotional, screamed and Uncle Ren opened his eyes and said, “What’s the matter with Olive?” The doctor said it was that scream that saved his life.

Sometime later when he was married he had to have the leg amputated.  All his life I remember him as he walked on his cork leg.  He learned to handle it very well and always earned a good living for his large family of children.  He had a coal yard and was very successful.   He was Bishop’s counselor and later Bishop of the Preston 2nd ward for a good many years.

Garth Johnson, a great-grandson of Lorenzo Johnson (Jim’s brother), also wrote an account about this accident with a few more details:

Jim’s youngest brother was Lorenzo, also known as Ren.  He was also the youngest in the family.  It is said that when he was to get married he had to have permission from his older brother, Jim, because his father had just died.  He worked at the sawmill with his brothers.  He was the mechanic and his job was to keep the circular saw greased and repaired.  One day he was filing the saw when the engineer opened the throttle on the steam engine which ran the saw.  The blade caught him, cutting his right leg and throwing him across the creek.

It was through the power of the priesthood he lived, having lost so much blood on the 20 mile wagon trip to Preston.  Joseph went to Jim’s, one block away, to get clothes for Ren. Dr. Ormsby told him not to leave because he would not be alive when he got back.  Joseph ran all the way feeling that he would recover.

Later Ren’s big toe and part of his foot was amputated.  He continued to have problems and slowly they removed more of his toes, bones and dead flesh from his leg.  Finally, in the fall about eight years later after the accident, he got gangrene in his leg and it was amputated six inches below the knee.  Dr. O.C. Ormsby of Logan Utah and Dr. M. B. Shipp of Preston performed the operation on the kitchen table with the only anesthetic known, cocaine shot into his leg.  It was done in Lorenzo’s (and his wife Mary’s) one room log cabin where they lived with their two small girls.  Later that year when another baby joined the family, Ren sewed all her baby clothes by hand, and washed the family’s clothes on a washboard, resting the stump of his leg on a chair.

He was fitted with a wooden or cork leg after the stump healed.  Having a wooden leg did not slow him down.  He could be found swimming in Bear River with his sons, square dancing and keeping up with any man at work.  His leg often gave him problems when he overdid it, especially in hot weather when working would make it raw.

This article came from the local newspaper in Preston, Idaho.

Successful Operation
An accident at the Saw Mill six years ago ends in the loss of a limb.

On Tuesday afternoon last, Lorenzo Johnson of this place had his right foot and part of the leg amputated about four inches above the ankle. Dr. O.C. Ormsby, of Logan, assisted by Dr. M.B. Shipp, of Preston, performed the operation, which was in every way successful.

A number of friends were present and gave what aid they could to the surgeons. Among the friends were Bishop W.C. Parkinson and wife, and Mrs. Olive Johnson, sister-in-law of “Ren.” The two ladies exhibited wonderful nerve during the trying ordeal.

The patient was under the influence of ether and chloroform, and experienced no pain whatever until it was all over.

It has been a source of dread to the family for some time, but “Ren” had become reconciled to it. His wife had borne up bravely until she saw the doctors coming, when she broke down completely. The lady, herself, was ill and the anxiety and strain upon her caused her to be more affected than she probably would have been otherwise. She was not present during the amputation….

Some six years ago, while working at the Johnson Bros. Sawmill, Ren was standing against the saw when it suddenly started up, cutting away part of the flesh at the back of his leg, above the knees, destroying the nerves in that part of the limb, thus shutting off the nerve supply from the food, causing the member to ulcerate and become dead and ossified. At one time, part of the big toe on this foot was amputated, and subsequently the balance of the toe was taken off. Later, another toe was removed and afterward a large bone was taken out of the foot. After each operation, the sores partially healed, but his foot has never been entirely well since the accident at the mill, although the wound above the knee healed and has given him no bother. He has been able to do some work since he was hurt, until last summer, which he has lost entirely, and that together with numerous physicians’ bills for surgical treatment, has left the family in straightened circumstances.

Mr. Johnson has and is entitled to the sympathies of this entire community, and the people will doubtless, do all they can to give him aid, comfort and consolation in is great affliction.

Lorenzo Johnson lived on West Oneida during his years as bishop of the old 2nd Ward, and in his partnership with the Johnson & Merrill Coal Company. His injury and subsequent wooden leg didn’t seem to affect his work.

Jim and Harriet’s Family
By 1900 Jim and Harriet had eight living children in their family.  Three were born in Hyde Park and the rest in Preston, Idaho.

4. Louis Johnson, 2 September 1888
5. Baby boy Johnson, stillborn, 23 October 1891
6. Gloyd Johnson, 8 September 1892; died 16 October 1892
7. Floyd Johnson, 8 September 1892
8. Howard Johnson, 21 February 1894
9. Harriet Johnson, 14 August 1897
10. Hazel Johnson, 5 November 1899

Harriet had also lost a baby boy who died at full term and he was always counted as one of her children. He was born between Louis and the twins. The following are quotations from the personal history of Hazel about the births of her siblings.

When Mother had Lou, she had some trouble that she told me about later.  They had a midwife in Preston but when Mother took sick her sisters were there… The afterbirth wouldn’t come.  So Uncle Joe, my father’s brother, went up for Sister [Fannie] Swan, the midwife.  Sister Swan was gone up to Mapleton, a little town about twelve miles away, but of course that was by horse and buggy. So Uncle Joe went to another midwife there in Preston.  That midwife said, “I have a sick baby, and I won’t come. I won’t leave it.”

Uncle Joe said, “I’ll get Olive and she’ll sit right by your baby, and won’t leave if you’ll just come.  The baby’s born but the afterbirth won’t come.”

But she said, “No, you have her get up on her knees and when she has a pain, pull on the cord.”  But it still wouldn’t come, so Uncle Joe went up to Mapleton to get Sister Swan.

Sister Swan said, “Well, I have just delivered this baby so I can come now.  What did they do for Harriet?”  Uncle Joe told her and she went with him, got the afterbirth and everything turned out all right.

But after it was all over through Sister Swan said, “Now you girls, listen to me.  Don’t ever do that again (pull on the cord).  If that had broken loose you could never have stopped the bleeding.  So don’t ever do that again.”  They were just her sisters who didn’t know much about it.

When Mother had the twins, Gloyd and Floyd, Gloyd died at six weeks.  He was the strongest one, but he got a cold or something, I’m not sure just what.  They were born the 8th of September, and he died October 16.

Floyd was the twin that lived, but he was the first of us children to die later, in 1951.  He was a dentist.  He went to Logan and graduated from Utah State University there, and then went back to dental school in Chicago.  Very few people went to college in those days unless they were going to be a professional person.

Mission Years

Harriet on her Own
Jim left for his mission to Denmark, the old home of his parents, in October 1900.  Hazel, their youngest child, was eleven months old and the oldest, Jim, was 18.  The money from the partnership was used to support him.

In the summer, Harriet and  the three smallest children spent their time on the 160 acres of dry farm in the clay hills in Winder that they were homesteading. (Howard states that she only did this for one summer.) While there they lived in a shanty. They had to haul water in cans for all purposes. Harriet was very resourceful as you can imagine.  Joe and Julia Roper lived on 160 acres joining the property and helped them.

Hattie (Johnson Greaves) remembers this about her Aunt Julia:

Aunt Julia was a remarkable woman.  Even though she had only a small board shanty she always had a braided rug on the floor and a table cloth and a nice looking quilt or spread on her bunk.  She said any place she had to live had to be fixed up homelike as much as was possible.  She was president of the Relief Society in our ward and always had single horse buggy and a bay mare called Snap. This was entirely for her own use.  I remember one day we went over to her shanty and a large rattle snake was lying curled up under this buggy which she had left in the shade in front of the shanty.  We called to her so excitedly—my mother was more emotional about things of that nature than she was–she came out and gave the buggy a quick shove onto the rattler which pinned it down while she ran and got the axe and chopped it to bits.  What a frightening experience for us!  We knew that rattlers were deadly, although I have always been just as terrified of any harmless snake.

While Jim was gone, Harriet needed a new table. They had 12 acres of ground that she decided to use to get the money. She had her boys plant sugar beets on this land, and she sold the beets to buy the table. One day she and Edna were going to thin them but the boys wouldn’t let them. Harriet’s sons also thinned the beets and at harvest time the money earned was enough to buy a table.

In the winters of 1901 and 1902, Harriet took her younger children up the canyon to the sawmill to cook for the crew of about twenty men.  The older children would stay in Preston to go to school.  Joseph Johnson was in charge of the sawmill. There was a lot of snow in the winter time there. Their house was heated with a stove and was usually cold. In fact, one year Hattie’s toes froze. Hattie has written about those winters at Birch Creek:

We had a one room cabin for cooking and eating in.  Also mother and the children slept in it in wall bunks.

Because I was too little to go out in the snow and cold and the money was needed for warm clothing for the boys, I didn’t have any shoes.  My feet became frozen and for years after as soon as the cold weather would come I would start suffering from chill blains.  To this day I haven’t enjoyed canyons.

I suppose I got such a horror of them as a little child.  I told my sister Edna once that I didn’t care for canyons and she said, “I don’t wonder after those winters in Birch Creek.”  Snow was even with the top of the house and my brothers had cut steps from the door up to the level and then down to the creek so they could dip up water.  One day I cried to go out and see the outside and Lou said, “Hell! I’ll bet this kid hasn’t been out for days.” So he picked me up and carried me with him to dip up a bucket of clear cold water.

At evening Lou spent the time carving out bob sleighs for Floyd and Howard.  They were very small but exact replicas of the regular sleighs we used to go up to the canyon and home.  I remember how much fun those two little boys had playing with their sleighs.  Their job was to keep enough firewood for mother.  As I remember it they must have been good little fellows, entertaining themselves and helping out whenever needed.  Always cheerful and enjoying the canyon as if it were a lark.

One night Mother woke up and found Hazel awfully sick.  She was taking convulsions and had a high fever.  There was nothing there with which to doctor a sick baby and we were thirty miles from town in the dead of winter.  Mother sent Laurence out to the bunk house and he called Uncle Joe [who had to dig the sleigh out of 10 feet of snow.]  He hitched up the team on the sleigh and we started for home.  It was so cold and there was a bad blizzard.

We had an old dog, Smiler that we just loved.  He was trudging along behind the sleigh and as we passed a farm house in Glencoe a dog came out and fought with our dog.  He was pushed under the runners and killed.  As we started away I cried and said we couldn’t leave him there in the snow.  So Lou got off and threw him on the sleigh.  After a while I went to sleep and so as we were coming down the Davis dugway they rolled him over the hill.

This Davis dugway was always a nightmare to me.  It is so narrow and steep and such a drop off at the side.  Many a vehicle has tipped over and rolled down the hill.  My brothers and father used to haul lumber down there and have had many a near tragedy on it.  It was with a feeling of relief when the new road to Mink Creek bypassed the Davis dugway.  I will never forget how sad I was and how broken hearted Howard was at old Smiler’s death.  He has always loved dogs.  We got home in time to get a doctor and medical aid to Hazel so the she recovered in a few weeks.

Jim’s Mission in Denmark
Interestingly enough, Jim served with two of the future fathers-in-law of his two youngest daughters, Hattie and Hazel.

On the ship, Commonwealth, going to his mission to Denmark, his ancestral home, he traveled with Thomas C. Greaves, also from Preston.  Thomas’s mission was in England which was also the home of Thomas Greaves’ ancestors.  Then, while Jim and Thomas were on their   missions, the Preston Ward was divided into four wards.  The northwest section where the Johnsons lived became the Third Ward. George H. Carver was the first bishop with James Johnson and Thomas C. Greaves as his counselors.  It was a year later before Jim returned from Denmark to take an active role in this position. Years later, Elder Thomas Greaves’ son Todd married Hattie Johnson, a daughter of James Johnson.

Also while on his mission, Jim served with a missionary by the name of Christen N. Christensen from Brigham City. They became friends and remained friends all their lives. As a result of this friendship Elder Christensen’s son, Marcus Joy, met and married Hazel Johnson, Jim’s youngest daughter.

While Jim was in Denmark, he visited many of the friends and relatives of his parents.  In his missionary journal, he mentions visiting places where his folks were born and all the cousins that he met.  They were all glad to get to know him, but didn’t join the Church.  He spoke of tearful farewells when he left.

Throughout his journal, he spoke often of his family at home.  He never called his wife by her name, Harriet.  He referred to her as “my dear one,” “my loved one,” and his family as my “loved ones.”  He mentions the letters he received from his children and the pictures that were sent to him.  He would write separately to the children as he received letters from them.

He was in charge of a large group of missionaries, serving as the Aalborg Conference president.  One time he went on some business to see the king of Denmark, King Christian IX.  The King visited with him for an hour or two, asking questions about his parents and religion.  There were two books on his desk: one the Bible and the other the Book of Mormon. Jim considered this a great honor to talk to the kindly Danish king.

In his history, Howard Johnson recorded the date that his father arrived back home in Preston.  “Father came home in 1903 on my birthday, February 21st.”

Farming and Ranching
In the fall of each year the four brothers divided up the proceeds from their summers’ work.  They continued this until their families became so large that they needed to branch out, and so the properties were divided up.  This was in the early 1900’s after Jim returned from his mission.

Blackhurst Ranch
In the spring of 1904 Jim went into another partnership with his brother Joseph and they bought the Blackhurst Ranch east of Preston. The partners took turns living on the ranch for a year at a time, managing the ranch and keeping the house.

Also, in 1904 another son was added to the family, born in Preston: Orene Lamb Johnson, 12 October 1904.

The year 1905 was the James Johnson family’s turn to live on the Blackhurst Ranch. There were about 40 cows to milk and they were pastured on the hills adjoining the ranch. The boys spent a lot of time wrangling the cows and helping with the chores. Louis remembers driving the cows to pasture and bringing them in at night. He said a good cow pony was a must. Year after year, he said they took a herd of pigs three miles out to feed on stubble. They would herd them in the day and pen them up at night.

There was a reservoir on the ranch called Blackhurst reservoir that is also known as the Johnson Reservoir, and it is still known by either name today. The Blackhurst Ranch was in a section of Preston known as Egypt.

More About the Winder Farm
In 1909 Jim sold his share of the ranch and he and his family returned to work the farm in Winder. The farm in Winder was the acreage that had been homsteaded. When they first went to Winder they had just a log house with a shanty where they cooked. It was a little house with a small living room and a couple of bedrooms. The shanty for cooking was separate because it was so hot. It had a wood burning stove. One can imagine that they ate outdoors. They started to build a larger house, but after the family started to marry and move away, Louis and his family lived in the house and ran the farm. For a while, Louis and his wife had lived in the little log cabin while they finished the house.

It was a dry farm so there was no irrigation. Most of the grain was planted in the fall because there wasn’t enough moisture for the spring grain. When the boys (men) were just plowing and planting and doing other chores, they would batch it. Their mother would fix up a grub box for them to take. It was filled with bread and staples, eggs, bacon and what meat they could take. Since they didn’t have a refrigerator they could take fresh meat for the first day of the week, but then ate mostly bacon and eggs.

By this time, Edna was married to Harrison R. Merrill. They lived next to Jim and Harriet in the town of Preston. During the harvest season, Harriet and Edna took turns going out to the farm and staying all week, coming home on Sunday. The other one would stay in town and tend the garden, do the canning and whatever else needed to be done there. Hattie and Hazel would take turns going with them to the farm, but mostly it was Hazel because Hattie didn’t like to go. Hazel thought it was fun.

They had built a small reservoir for the house. The children liked to swim in it but it was a muddy mess in the summer. They had a well for the water on the farm, but they couldn’t drink from it. It was all right when you were drinking, but the minute you quit, you had a gasoline-like taste in your mouth. Jim always said he thought there was oil under the farm, but they never did anything about it.

Rene (Orene) always went to the farm and he and Hazel would tend the cows. They had a peg leg pony called Peggy that Hazel would ride. Rene would ride the old brood mare. There were only three or four cows but they had to keep them out of the wheat fields. They rode all over the farm. They would take the cows about two miles from one field to another after the grain was cut. Hazel was about fourteen to sixteen years old then and Rene was five years younger. One time they were just sitting and watching the cows and they saw someone walking across the fields. They thought it was an Indian and became frightened, but it was just their mother coming to see why they hadn’t brought the cows in yet.

Little Mountain Farm
In 1912, Jim, his sons and son-in-law, Harrison R. Merrill, bought 700 acres of land in Winder from Joseph Roper. They worked as a group until 1916 when the land was divided up and each worked his share. (See Agreement addendum at end of this chapter.)  The farm was at a place called Little Mountain, and was rented from the sugar beet factory until they could buy it. After a while the only ones left who farmed were Louis and Orene. The others had moved on to other professions. The land that was owned was divided up and Orene took the farm at Little Mountain, and Louis and his family took the farm east. There was a hollow between the two farms and a trail through the hollow so they were connected. It was around 1924 that division occurred.

Jim and Harriet lived on the Little Mountain Farm with Orene and Glenna Cordingly Johnson and their family. There was a lot of back and forth between the two farms as they helped each other. Harriet had devised a way to keep the milk cool so it wouldn’t spoil so fast. They had a shelf for the pans of milk and a shelf above over which they would drape a wet canvas. The evaporation would keep the milk cooler. They were always troubled with flies. They would drive them to the door and then out of the house. Jim figured out how many flies there were per square foot and if there was only one house, that house had a lot of flies.

Memories of the Farms
Roma Johnson Perry remembers that they did not have grass around the house, but they had one flower bed of big zinnias. They would water them by hand using a can with holes punched in the bottom and dipping water from the ditch. Also the kids could wade and play in the ditch, but only when the shade of the house covered the ditch. One time Howard (Roma’s father) put a belt on the washing machine and hooked it to the car so that the battery ran the washing machine that usually was turned by hand.

Roma recalls one time on the farm that they lost K, her younger brother. They had searched the yards, even going up and down each row of corn. They were just getting prepared to lower someone into the well to find out if he had fallen in, when his mother made one more search of the house and found him asleep under the bed.

While they were living at the Little Mountain Farm, they had Mexicans who worked for them, Frankie and his wife. Frankie’s wife was a good cook, but they liked their food “hot.” They would invite Jim in to eat with them. He always did but it would nearly kill him because the spices were so strong.

Helen Johnson Taylor (Lou’s eldest daughter) tells about another time with Frankie.

Frankie was tending the cattle and the big Holstein bull got out and started chasing him. He ran around the house hollering for his wife to open the door. He made about three rounds when Grandpa came and diverted the bull.

Hazel Johnson Fisher (Lou’s second daughter) tells of how clean they (Frankie and his wife) were. She always admired her white linens with pretty lace. Her floors were always clean enough to eat off.

One summer, Helen and Hazel stayed in the house in lower Winder and Louis and Dorothy and the two boys were staying at Little Mountain. Helen and Hazel were to milk the cows and churn butter for the families at Little Mountain. They would put the milk in pans for the cream to rise, then skim it off and churn butter. One morning, they found a mouse floating in the cream.  After some deliberation, they took the mouse out of the cream, churned the butter and delivered it to the farm.

Helen describes Jim and Harriet:

As I remember Grandpa he was a well-built man, probably around 6 feet. He was always very distinguished looking even in work overalls. A handsome man. He loved people and treated everyone alike; it made no difference if they were senators, church authorities, non-members of the church, or plain farm hands. In turn everyone loved and respected him.

I was working as secretary for Stanger Implements. One day a call came from Grandpa to deliver something. The salesman came to Mr. Stanger and asked what should he do about payment. Mr. Stanger said, “Give him anything he wants. He’ll pay. His word is good.”

Grandma was about 5’3”, medium weight. She had a light complexion. When I knew her she had long gray hair and wore it in a bun. I remember she used to brush it 50 times every night. Grandma was very good natured and had a great sense of humor. She was a good cook. I especially remember her pickles and sauerkraut. The sauerkraut was made in a 5 gallon crock and kept in the closet under the stairs. We used to go in and get a dish of it all the time. It was so good. The pickles that she made were called “chow chow.”

A Daughter’s Memories
The following was taken from Hazel Johnson Christensen’s (youngest daughter of Jim and Harriet) personal history:

On our farm I remember the threshing, the heading and the threshing. There were three header boxes, and they would follow the harvester around. It would have a spout that would shoot the wheat into the header box; when one was full the other one would come up. One was unloading, one filling and the other one coming back ready. The header would never stop.

They hitched onto horses. I used to ride in the header box sometimes. Harrison, my brother-in-law drove one header box and his brother, Madison drove one. Those were the only two that would let me ride. It was kind of fun to have the wheat come in on us. We would stand up by the driver and we would sure get dirty and sticky. I would get sleepy from the heat, too. But I liked to go out and ride around. I was probably about twelve then.

Our neighbor up on the hill from us had a man come and work for him one summer.  I can’t remember his name or anything about him, only that I rode all one day with him on the tractor all around their land.  We didn’t have a tractor, so that was quite the thing.  But I got spots of oil all over me and Mother had a time getting it out of my dress.

Then there was the threshing.  They had the big steam engine come and thresher had a long belt.  I remember we used to run under the belt.  Father would get after us every time.  He said, “If that belt came off, it would kill you.”  Once in a while they did come off.

We had our farm nine miles out of town.  When we first went out there, we had just a log house with a shanty that we cooked in.  It was a little house with a small living room and a couple of bedrooms, then the shanty to cook in because it was hot.  The shanty had a wood stove.  After a while they built a house.  My brother Lou lived in it, and I lived with him the year I taught school out there.

More about Jim and Harriet

Jim’s Industry
After Jim returned from his mission, his business grew and he was making quite a bit of money, but like most prosperous men of that time, he pulled a few costly blunders. For one example, he bought several thousand dollars worth of stock in a Tungsten mine in Nevada which as far as he knows never really existed. At least the tungsten never paid.

Another bad investment was when he bought a great deal of supposedly good land in Mud Lake. When he went to see what he had bought, it so happened all his land was right in the middle of Mud Lake covered with water.

Although Jim and Harriet spent a lot of time in farming, Jim also had time to pursue some of his favorite occupations in working with mechanics. Not only did he engineer the building of railroads before and after he married, but he studied electricity and was a believer that it should be brought into Preston. To me there is no doubt that he could fix any machinery that needed fixing. He would study the workings of anything mechanical until he knew how and why it worked. He also helped build the dam by Soda Springs. He must have taught his boys all this, as my father (Louis) could and did fix anything, and I’m sure that his other sons could do the same.

Jim’s daughter Hazel Johnson Christensen said that farming was not an occupation that he enjoyed, and he didn’t do too much. He let his boys do it. He was more mechanically inclined and enjoyed working with the big machinery. They lived one year in Lewiston, Utah when Jim was master mechanic at the sugar factory there.

When they moved to Lewiston, the children walked two miles through the ice and snow to school. The family rented a house and moved there but didn’t move their furniture or sell their home in Preston.  They would go back home once or twice a month to see about things there. They would go in a white top buggy. It had two seats and a white canvas top on it.

Hazel continues:

There was a man in Lewiston that bought an automobile. It was the first automobile I ever saw, and it was red. I used to dread to go out because we always met him and the horses would jump and prance and sometimes run. It would scare me to death, but they always held them in. I was a little afraid of those horses.

Jim helped build several canals and irrigation systems in Franklin County and for many years he was president of the Oneida Irrigation District. If a business concern ever went into bankruptcy, Jim Johnson would be appointed a receiver to help reorganize the company. When the Pioneer Sugar Company went bankrupt, he was appointed a receiver and sold it to the present owners, Franklin County Sugar Company.

At one time Jim owned a blacksmith store and he had a Studebaker automobile dealership in Preston.

An incident that greatly impressed Jim concerned a prophecy he heard made by Brigham Young to the effect that many people in the audience that day would see the day when the line of homes from Brigham City to Salt Lake City would be literally unbroken and people would be able to go to Salt Lake City and back in a day to conference without any trouble and little hurry. People were very skeptical about this. Yet we know this has been fulfilled, for there are people all along the way from Brigham City to Salt Lake City and the automobile makes the trip in a very short time.

Harriet’s Homemaking
Harriet was very frugal. They raised and preserved food for winter time. They would put away enough food for the whole winter. Jim would take wheat to the mill and have it ground into flour, enough for the year. Every fall he would buy a big box of raisins, dried prunes, coconut and sacks of sugar.

Harriet didn’t do much gardening as she had too many children to tend, so the boys took care of the garden. She would put foods and butter in buckets and lower them in the well next to the water to keep cool. Even so, lots of leftovers had to be fed to the pigs, chickens, dogs, etc, because it wouldn’t keep. Because of the lack of refrigeration all the meat had to be cured which they did themselves. Pork could be kept better than beef. The pork was salt cured and the beef dried, then buried in the wheat bin during the summer time.

In the fall she would make five gallon cans of peach or fruit preserves. She bottled fruit though not too much at first because there were not too many jars. They had their own apple trees. Her pickles, called “chow-chow,” are the same as we call mustard pickles today. They would keep well if put in a dirt cellar.

Harriet always churned butter. She would set milk in pans, about a gallon at a time, and put it on the shelf in the pantry until it clabbered. Then she would skim off the cream and make butter out of it. She would make cottage cheese out of the clabber and pancakes from the butter milk.

Her granddaughter, Hazel Johnson Fisher, said she remembers all the pies and bread that her Grandmother would make. She had the reputation of being able to make the best pie crust in the neighborhood. She never had a written recipe if someone asked for it. She was also a good bread maker. She kept her own live yeast start. She would use potato water in it, also adding sugar. Potato water was very valuable then. She had to mix bread often or the natural leavening made from the potato water would sour as there was no place to keep it cool.  Hazel also said that her mother, Dorothy, learned to make Danish dumplings from Harriet. She probably learned this from her Danish mother-in-law. These were a favorite in the family.

Harriet was always willing to let the boys have a dog, but she didn’t like cats. She was always trapping and poisoning mice. She would use strychnine in a little flour and kept a mixture on a plate under the cupboard. One day she came in to find Floyd with flour on his mouth and down the front of his clothes. She became very excited and fed him egg whites to make him vomit.

Another time with mice; she opened a lid on a box, saw a mouse in it and began to hop backwards clear across the floor. Howard was stretched out in a chair with his legs out and she fell over them and went scooting across the floor on her hands and knees. This was to the delight of the other children.

Harriet enjoyed reading, especially a good novel, and she read a lot, every chance she had.

It was said that she was a marvelous quilter and made lots of quilts. She was also very fast and good at knitting. If one of her children needed a new pair of mittens for the following day, she would sit down that evening and knit a pair. She could start and finish one stocking in an evening. The girls used to wear black stockings up to their knees that she had knitted. All the Lamb sisters, Susie, Julia, Olive and Harriet were known for their knitting abilities. They created an exquisite and difficult family heirloom pattern called “diamond lace” (see pattern addendum at end of this chapter).

Harriet would make the boys shirts and buy denim and make overalls. She made their night clothes and underclothes, using flour sacks to make the panties for the girls. Her sister-in-law, Laura Johnson Hansen, (Jim’s sister who lived in Preston) would make the dresses for the girls.

Jim’s Leadership
Jim loved people and they loved and admired him. He was honest and trustworthy in all his dealings with others. He was also successful in his church callings–a born leader. He served in the bishopric in his ward. As mentioned previously, he was still on his mission when he was sustained as a counselor in the bishopric. At this time there was no meeting house in the area of the Third Ward so they worked hard to build one.  James and his brothers and brother-in-law got out the logs and sawed them in the Chapman mill.  Later James stayed and sawed for Chapman to pay for using his mill.  Then in 1910 he was called to be a counselor to President Geddes in the new stake presidency. Being in the presidency required him to travel around the stake to give talks. His daughter Hazel was the secretary in the stake Primary. She would go with him to represent the Primary. She comments in her history, “My father was never a good speaker, he was a dry speaker, but he was a natural leader.”

Jim was also a leader in politics. He was elected to the Idaho House of Representatives from Oneida County. When the county was divided into Oneida and Franklin Counties, he was the first elected senator from Franklin County. His picture still hangs in the State Capitol at Boise (2004).

As Jim grew older, he was always trying to help his sons on their farms, especially Louis and Orene. They did not want him working so hard, so to get him off the farm, they encouraged him to run for a judge or some public office. Jim ran for and was elected Probate Judge in Franklin County. Just a note here. This man had only formally a fourth grade education, and was now a judge to preside over court cases. Ben Johnson (non-relative) once told of a case over which Jim presided, how difficult the case had been and what a great decision Jim had made. He was very complimentary toward Jim.

While Jim was a judge, he was instrumental in keeping mischievous boys out of jail by being responsible for them. He would take them fishing or hiking and always showed love for them. He “saved” many souls. Jim always knew what was right and what was wrong when he had to make his decisions. One year he was the only Republican elected. He never lost an election and he was quite proud of this. He served for two terms and since he was getting older, he decided not to run for another term and he died not too many years later.

There was a doctor in Preston, G. W. States. He was not a member of the L.D.S. Church.  He was a dear friend of Jim’s and very active in the community affairs. There were some Church women who for some reason started rumors about him, and he lost a lot of his practice. Jim was very upset and said they were not truth and stood by him, and most people doubted that they were true. But having lost so much of his practice, he died a broken-hearted man. Jim spoke at his funeral.

Harriet’s Service
Harriet was loved by everyone. She was very easy to work with in her Church callings, and easy and fun to be around. On one occasion Bishop Carver, on giving the yearly report for the ward, stated his high attendance at sacrament meeting and said Sister Harriet Johnson was next. She never made but urged her children to go to church. She would always take them. She saw all her children married and sealed in the temples.

It was also said that Harriet was one of the most even-tempered women around. She was always good-natured, kind and helpful. However, she would become angry if you said anything against the general authorities. She claimed this was the first step to apostasy.

On February 2, 1902 the Preston Ward was divided into four wards. Harriet was sustained as the first Primary president of the new Third Ward, and held this position for many years. On August 16, 1911, she was released as Primary president and sustained as first counselor to Nellie P. Head in the Relief Society of the Third Ward, and held this position for many years. Harriet was a Relief Society (visiting) teacher nearly all her married life. She was a counselor to Mrs. Maughan in the Oneida Stake primary for a short time. Harriet did a lot of temple work, making the trip to Hyde Park to spend a few days with her parents and attending sessions at the Logan Temple.

Harriet had a sweet alto voice and was fond of singing in the choir and going to practice.  She was a member of the stake choir for many years and a member of the ward choir until ill health forced her to quit. She sang duets in Relief Society with her daughter-in-law, Mary Johnson, wife of Laurence. She also sang a lot to her granddaughter Roma Johnson Perry. Roma still remembers the songs she sang, especially “Froggy Went a Courting” which she says is a very long song. Roma also sang with her grandma. No doubt Harriet sang to all her children and grandchildren.

Reaping the Rewards
Harriet died when she was only 71. It was in February, cold and snowy. She and Jim were living on the farm at Little Mountain. Hattie, her daughter, lived in Preston and she told the family that she was washing dishes at the kitchen sink under the kitchen window when she looked out and saw Jim drive up with the sleigh. When he came in he said, “Can I bring your mother in and put her to bed? She’s really sick.” He carried her up the stairs and put her to bed. She was there about three weeks when she passed away.

A spiritual experience happened to her just before she died. Hattie and Jim were sitting on one side of her bed and her sister Susan was on the other side. Susie was just a couple of years older than Harriet. Harriet was in a coma, and they were keeping vigil when Harriet opened her eyes and said, “I’ve been to the prettiest place, all pastel colors.” Then she turned to Susie and said, “Susie, quit worrying about Earl. He’s just as happy as can be.” (Earl was Susie’s married son that had been killed.). Harriet continued, “I saw Tracy,” and mentioned half a dozen of our dead relatives that she’d seen. (A niece, Tracy, daughter of Suel E. Lamb, had died in 1924.) Then she closed her eyes and passed away. This was in February of 1933.  Jim always said, “I’m satisfied that she had a glimpse of the other side before she died.”

A quote from daughter Hazel:

After Mother died, Hattie and I were standing out in Hattie’s kitchen by the stove. Uncle John, her youngest brother, was standing there with us. I was saying how I always liked Grandma, my mother’s mother [Elizabeth Zimmerman]. She was such a sweet person. He said, “She didn’t have the disposition your mother [Harriet] did. I have seven sisters, and she had the most even disposition of any of them.”  And she did.

Selma Kern Johnson, Harriet’s daughter-in-law (Howard’s wife) was always so sad over the way Harriet had had to work so hard and the fact they ended up without many worldly possessions. When the Great Depression hit the country, Jim and Harriet were especially hit hard and lost almost all that they had. One night Selma said that she saw Harriet. She couldn’t say if she was awake or dreaming, but Harriet told her not to worry or be sad, that she was alright. After that her mind was at ease.

After Harriet died in February, Jim stayed on the farm with Orene and Glenna until that fall. He then moved into Preston and lived with his son Howard and wife, Selma, who had bought Jim and Harriet’s home from them when they went to live at Little Mountain.

In 1934 Jim ran for Probate Judge for Franklin County and he was elected; he was elected again in 1936. According to Verna Greaves, who wrote a history of Jim, he felt that two terms were enough since he was close to eighty, and Jim retired from public life, never having been defeated in an election. Jim lived there in Preston with Howard and Selma until he passed away on Friday, 18 October of 1940. Jim was well known around town and would visit with his friends and visit with his children. He kept busy but he missed his companion and pined for her until he passed away. His funeral was held in the Preston Third Ward on Monday, October 21, 1940.

In November of 1938 Jim was out at the farm by Little Mountain with Orene and  Glenna and their two boys and three year old daughter, Karen. Karen had become very ill with some kind of food poisoning.   Everyone was just waiting in the living room when Jim got up and went outside on the porch. When he came back in, he announced to all that he had just been talking to Grandma (Harriet), and that she had come for Karen. Karen passed away shortly after this on the 20th of November in 1938.  Glenna mourned a long time for her beautiful little girl.

Little Karen Johnson and several other grandchildren are buried in the quiet little Preston Cemetery near Jim and Harriet. Those two wonderful Preston pioneers are buried side by side near the eastern boundary of the cemetery, less than a quarter of the way from the north side (GPS Coordinates: Latitude: 42.12310, Longitude: -111.85750). Their children are buried close around them except Edna who is buried in Provo, Utah and Hazel, who is buried in Las Vegas, Nevada.

James Johnson is a great man, and Harriet is the great woman who stood by his side, a true help mate. They truly believed in the gospel of Jesus Christ, and they lived it. They were both loved and honored by the community of Preston for their good works in helping to build this town in southern Idaho.  They are honored by those who are still living for their kindness and dedication to their family, their Church and their community.

Additional Memories of Jim and Harriet Johnson

Hazel Johnson Christensen (daughter)
My father was the first counselor in the stake presidency. He had an automobile and President Geddes didn’t. When the general authorities would come up to visit for stake conference, Father would meet the train. We used to have two full days of conference, two meetings Saturday and two Sunday. The authorities would come to Preston Friday night about nine o’ clock when the train got in, and then they would stay until Monday morning when the train left. We would have them three nights.

One time President Geddes said, “We will take the visitors this time. It will be President Heber J. Grant. (He was a counselor at that time.) We’ll take him so you won’t need to bother.”

But Mother always went through our house, every quarterly conference, just like a spring cleaning. She would do a lot of cooking because sometimes they would bring extra visitors that she wouldn’t know about.  This time Father took President Geddes to meet President Grant, and when they got up to the Geddes’ house to let them out, President Geddes said, “Brother Grant, you’re going to stay with us this time.”

President Grant said, “No, I’ve stayed with you folks before. I’m going down and stay with Brother Johnson this time.” So what could Father do but take him home. On the way home President Grant confided, “I just can’t stand Sister Geddes. I’ve been there before and I just have a hard time with her.”

I knew what he meant and so did Father and Mother. Sister Geddes was a bit off. I guess she just had a few screws loose. They just got in the house when the phone rang and it was Sister Geddes. She said, “Brother Grant, I’ve done a lot of cooking, and I’ve got a lot here to eat. I sure want you to come back and stay to our place.”

“I’m sure Sister Johnson has, too,” he replied. “I can smell the cooking that she’s been doing.” That’s the way President Grant was, very outspoken. Father couldn’t blame him.

Hyrum M. Smith, Joseph Fielding’s brother that was an apostle, came once. Joseph Fielding and Hyrum M. were apostles together. I don’t remember if Joseph Fielding was there, but I do remember Hyrum. Oscar Kirkham was there a time or two and the presiding bishop came. One of the seven presidents of the seventies came, Brother Seymour B. Young.

I remember Brother Young because when they came in, he hadn’t had his supper because the train took about four hours. Mother asked him, “Now wouldn’t you like something to eat before you go to bed?”

“Yes, I would,” he answered. “If you’ve got a bowl of milk and some bread and an onion, I’d like that.” So he ate a bowl of bread and milk, with an onion. The men used to have bread and milk in a bowl like a small mixing bowl. We’d (the women and children) have it in a cup, but my brother and father would eat in a bowl like that.

Brother Young ate that bowl of bread and milk and that onion, and the next day was fast day. Mother said, “I bet his breath smelled bad.” He was Levi Edgar Young’s father. He was quite old when he came. Levi Edgar Young came to our place, too.

We would really clean before conference, and they would come home to eat at noon between the conference sessions as well as at night. Mother cooked most everything that she could before then. Usually she would leave one of us kids home to finish or watch the dinner. Hattie stayed home a lot of the time. Then at night of course we would just have a cold meal.

After the conference sessions the authorities would sometimes have to stay to ordain or conduct interviews. By then the train had left and they would wait at the homes for the midnight train…

Joseph F. Merrill stayed at our house waiting for the midnight train. That’s quite an experience to have the general authorities. Brother Merrill was over in Europe as mission president. I don’t know whether it was just in England or the whole European Mission, but when King Edward VIII abdicated to get married to Wallis Simpson, he was there in England. It was not too long afterwards that he was to our place, and he told us all about that. It’s quite impressive to have the apostles come into your home.

Helen Johnson Taylor (Lou’s daughter)
When Grandpa was in the Stake Presidency in Preston the speakers for conference came from Salt Lake, usually one of the Twelve. They would always stay at Grandpa and Grandma’s. I remember when one of the Twelve was expected.

It was supper time and we were having dinner. Grandma had us all laughing our heads off as she was describing this general authority. She was imitating the way he talked and the way he ate. She was really being funny. Just then a knock came on the door and there he stood. Grandma was so embarrassed and always wondered how much he had heard.

Don J. Christensen (Hazel’s son)
When I was a boy my mother, Hazel, sometimes took me with her when she went to Idaho to see her parents.  We would ride on the street car in Salt Lake City and then get on the Inter-urban train for the ride to Grace, Idaho.  We were picked up at the railroad station by one of mother’s relatives.  We stayed in Preston at mothers’ parents’ home at 77 North First West.

The first thing I would do was ask my grandmother to make a floating island pudding.  This was a favorite with me and all of my cousins.  It was similar in taste to a deep dish apple pie, but Grandma made it in a dish pan.  She would roll out the dough on the table to make the crust; this was about 10 to 12 inches wide and about 20 inches long. She then filled it with sliced apples and spices and folded it up into a tube.  This was placed in the dish pan like a big doughnut.  Then in the middle she added more spices and a lot of butter.  This was then baked in the oven until nice and brown.  We all enjoyed eating it with cream or ice cream.

One time when we went up to Preston we stayed at the farm southwest of town. Grandma gave me a glass of milk.  It was nasty and when I complained I was told it was fresh milk that came out of the cow that morning.  I assured her that I didn’t like cow’s milk, only dairy milk.  Remember the old story about a first grade teacher asking who knew where milk came from.  One little boy said it comes in bottles.  Another knew more and said milk comes in cans.  Another student said no, milk comes in squirts.

When I was older we usually stayed in Aunt Hattie’s house when we visited Preston.  It was specially built for short people, as both Uncle Todd and Aunt Hattie were very short.  It is the only place I had to bend over to wash dishes.

Anna Christensen Whitney (Hazel’s daughter)
Here is something that was handed down from your 2nd great grandmother that you can hand down to your great-grandchildren. It is from Elizabeth Zimmerman Lamb to Harriet Emaline Lamb Johnson to Hazel Johnson Christensen to Anna Christensen Whitney etc. One thing this floating island pudding has meant to me has been love and caring and a warm house with a good smell on a cold day. It has been a favorite in each generation.

Grandma (Harriet) said to make the crust–make a light biscuit dough a little shorter than usual but not quite as short as pie dough. (increase shortening)  Roll the dough out to a rectangle and put the sliced apples on the dough. Bring the crust up over the apples (that you have sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar) and form a ring. Put in a deep pan–cover with boiling water, sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar again. Dot with a big piece of butter. Bake about an hour at medium temperature (375 degrees).

Updated Version of Floating Island Pudding
Here’s the recipe written for today’s cooks by Marilyn Prestwich, Anna’s daughter:

Combine 1 3/4 C. flour, 2 1/2 t. baking powder, 3/4 t. salt. Cut a little more than 1/2 C. shortening into the flour mixture with a pastry mixer or two knives.
Add 3/4 C. milk a little at a time until dough is pliable, but not sticky.
Roll dough out into a long rectangle, wide enough to fold over the apples, and long enough to form into a circle.
Slice and peel about 5 apples. Place apples in the middle of the rectangle. Sprinkle liberally with sugar and cinnamon.
Fold dough over the apples, pinching together at the top. This is the dumpling.
Place a large kettle next to the dough and place dumpling in the bottom of the pan in a circle.
Add enough boiling water until the dumpling is barely covered.
Sprinkle with more sugar and cinnamon. Slice 1/4 C. butter or margarine thinly and place them on top of the dumpling circle.
Bake about an hour at 375 degrees.

Addendums

Patriarchal Blessing of James Johnson
A blessing by C.W. Hyde, Patriarch, on the head of James, son of James and Mary Johnson. Born at Brigham City, Utah, Nov. 20, 1859. Given at Hyde Park, Utah, Sept. 21, 1874.

James, in the name of Jesus Christ I place my hands upon thy head and I seal upon you a Patriarchal Blessing. For you will be called to proclaim this gospel from City to City and from Country to Country and thou shalt do a great and a mighty work, for no weapon formed against you shall prosper, for thou shalt bring many to Zion with songs of great joy, for it is your privilege to live to the coming of the Son of God. You shall do a great and a mighty work for the living and the dead. Thou art of Joseph and a right to the fullness of the Priesthood and wives and a great Kingdom upon the earth. Shall be a savior upon Mount Zion. These blessings I seal upon    your head with eternal lives with all your father’s house hold. Amen.

Patriarchal Blessing of Harriet Emaline Lamb
A Blessing by C.W. Hyde, Patriarch on the head of Harriet Emeline, daughter of Suel and Elizabeth Lamb. Born Lehi, Utah Feb. 23, 1862. Given Sept. 2, 1873

Harriet Emeline: I place my hands upon thy head in the name of Jesus to seal upon you a Patriarchal Blessing. For thou art a very peculiar child unto the Father for thy wisdom shall reach within the veil for thou shall comprehend many things of the Father for it is your privilege to stand on the earth at the coming of the Messiah and to be changed at His coming. You shall reign upon the earth a thousand years for no good thing shall be held from thee. Thou art a daughter of Ephraim right to the fullness of the Priesthood and with a companion in due time a kingdom upon the earth to rise up and bless. You shall help to redeem your dead until you are satisfied. These blessings I seal upon your head, with eternal lives with all your Father’s household, to God and the Lamb forever and ever. Amen.

Interview with Judge James Johnson
The first electricity I ever saw was in Salt Lake in 1870. I went out to see the dynamo and thought it was a marvelous thing, but I doubted that it would work and create electricity. Being mechanically minded I studied the whole thing out and watched it work, but still couldn’t figure it out.

I was working at the old sugar plant at Lewiston and they had a unit there to generate their own lights. That was the first electricity I remember in Cache Valley. We had to keep the unit in good condition so as to have enough electricity for the lights. We pumped water from Cub River for power source, using steam to run the plant.

I came to Preston in 1885, and there was one store. When the village was organized later I was on the first board. Sometime between 1890 and 1895 I began to be curious about how to get electricity into Preston. I had been around electricity and plants enough to know the value of it and some of the ways of obtaining it. I made quite an investigation of a possible power plant site at Mink Creek. I figured we could enlarge the upper canal and build a little ways up Birch Creek. There was a 200 foot head there, and it seemed to me to be a logical place to have a little power plant for our village.

I went ahead and made measurements and confirmed my idea and studied the whole thing out before mentioning it to anyone. The big problem came in convincing the board. I presented it to them from a dozen different angles, but all in vain. The board members were old, some of them, the town was poor, and they weren’t much for big things like that. I told them that in 40 years the plant would be our own.

“We’ll never get out of debt,” they argued.

I suggested we take stock to pay for the machinery and build the plant ourselves. They continued to hold out and said, “If we build it, we’ll just have to sell it later to some rich outfit.”

“Well, what if we do!  We can get back what we put into it.”

They figured Preston wouldn’t grow big enough to need much power. I told them we could sell service to all the people between Preston and Mink Creek, Riverdale and the other places, as there were quite a few people lived up in there.

Later on in years a lot of them came to me and said we were foolish not to push ahead with my idea. But maybe it’s a good thing we didn’t. Probably if the bigger outfits had come along to buy us out, I would have been the first one to okay it if we could get better service by doing it.

Even after the High Creek Company came in there was still a lot who wouldn’t take the service. They said it would cost too much and were too tight to give up the old cheap lamp.

Preston, July 29, 1939 by Wendell Eames and Newell Hart (The Cache Valley Newsletter, No. 34, August 1971).

James Johnson in other publications
1. JOHNSON, JAMES Jr. (son of James Johnson and Mary Nielsen). Born Nov. 20, 1859, Brigham City, Utah.

Married Harriet E. Lamb Dec. 23, 1880, Salt Lake Endowment house (daughter of Suel Lamb and  Elizabeth Zimmerman of Hyde Park, Utah), who was born Feb. 23, 1862. Their children: James E. b. Sept. 25. 1881, m. Annie A. Lewis Nov. 16, 1894; Laurence b. Nov. 5, 1883, m. Mary A. Stephens October, 1907; Edna b. May 19, 1886, m. Harrison R. Merrill Jan. 27, 1909; Louis b. Sept. 2, 1888; Floyd b. Sept. 8. 1892; Howard b. Feb. 21, 1895; Harriet b. Aug. 14, 1897; Hazel b. Nov. 5, 1899; Orene L. b. Oct. 12, 1904. Family home Preston, Idaho.

Missionary to Denmark 1900-03, and presided over the Aalborg conference at that place; counselor to Bishop Larson of Preston ward; and also to G. H. Carver of 3d ward, Preston; counselor to Joseph S. Geddes, president Oneida stake. (Esshom, Frank, Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah, pg. 969; photo pg.464)

2. Johnson, James, second counselor to Bishop John Larson, of Preston, Oneida county, Idaho, from 1898 to 1900, is the son of James Johnson and Mary Nielsen, and was born Nov. 20, 1859, at Brigham City, Utah. He was baptized at the age of nine years, and removed to Hyde Park, Cache county, with his parents in 1871. James labored in the different grades of the Aaronic Priesthood and was ordained an Elder in 1880, when he also married Miss Harriet E. Lamb. He removed to Preston, Idaho, in June, 1884, and was an important factor in the growth and development of that thrifty town, both as to its temporal affairs as well as in its ecclesiastical government. Brother Johnson is the father of ten children, eight of whom are living. In civil life he is a successful business man. For a number of years, he, together with his brothers and brothers-in-law, conducted a farming and lumbering business. Later, he went into merchandising. Oct. 2, 1898 he was ordained a High Priest and set apart as second counselor to Bishop John Larsen, of the Preston Ward, which position he honorably filled to the satisfaction of all concerned. He left Salt Lake City, Oct. 9, 1900, for a mission to Scandinavia. On his arrival in Copenhagen, he was appointed to labor in Denmark, where he is still engaged in missionary work. In all his ecclesiastical labors, Elder Johnson has enjoyed the full confidence of his brethren and has worked wholeheartedly for the good of the cause of Christ upon the earth (Jenson, Andrew, Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia pg. 441-2).

3. Joseph S. Geddes president of Oneida Stake 1910-1920; First counselor James Johnson 1910-1920; Second counselor Taylor Nelson 1910-1920 (Jenson, Andrew, Encyclopedic History of the Church p. 618)

Johnson’s Army Excerpts

Joseph Daines
That was quite a career we had going to Poverty Flat for seven years. I had high ambitions and thought I would make a little money, but it turned out not to be so profitable. We first went up in 1892 when Clyde was just a baby. He was about six weeks old and Myra held him all the way up there on a pillow while we rode those bumpy roads in a wagon. After we got there the cabin was not ready and we had to spend some time preparing it for use, so we had to camp in the wagon at first. We had to stay on the land six months each year to homestead it, so we went up there in the summer and stayed in Hyde Park in the winter. We did this for seven summers, during which time I cleared a hundred acres of heavy sage brush with an old Oliver chill plow—a walking plow. It was so dull that I had to cut much of the sage brush by hand with an ax or burn it out.…The first year we were out there we spent all of our time clearing sagebrush. The next year the wheat did not mature and I did not even harvest mine; some cows ate it off. That year Robert and I worked for Brother Armstrong on the Church ranch northeast of us, so we could get enough money to finish our planting. The year I was working in the Logan Temple Myra went out and stayed alone so we could complete our homesteading. James did the work on the farm.

We had very poor crops. The last year I was there in 1898, just before I left to go on my mission, I harvested 2,000 bushels of wheat. I stored part of it with Orson Smith and lost that when he went broke. I got enough money from it to take me on my mission and take care of me while I was sick. I also added a little on to our home in Hyde Park and bought a few more acres of land.

During the time we were at the flat we never broke the Sabbath by traveling home. It took us all day to get to Hyde Park. It took four hours to get to Preston. Often we went there to church. Myra had five sisters in Preston and we would stay with them. Sometimes we went to church in Clifton; that was not quite so far away. We seldom stayed on the flat on Sunday. [I was called on a mission.]… I sold two spans of horses, my plow, a mare, and all the loose things I could find around the place. I kept a colt, a wagon, and a harness.  The preceding summer I had been to the canyon and got enough lumber to build a barn. I sold the lumber to George Woolf and got a little money for that. After I sold everything of that type I had, I still needed more money, so I had to sell Poverty Flat.

Joseph Roper
[Joseph B. Roper] entered the employ of the Utah & Northern Railroad, which was then building to Butte. He was connected with this enterprise until 1883, when he came to Preston, secured employment for a year on the irrigating canals and, in 1884, he bought the ranch he now owns and occupies one block from the center of the town. James and Joseph Johnson and Mr. Hawkes came to this section of the county about the same time and in partnership with Mr. Roper they formed a company, under the name of James Johnson & Co., for the purpose of carrying on extensive farming operations and other enterprises, Lorenzo Johnson later joining the firm. They bought residence property adjoining that of Mr. Roper, and on portions of it built their present fine homes.

The company first located on school land two and one-half miles northwest of Preston, which they subsequently bought, and here they started farming on a scale of some magnitude. They also bought a threshing outfit and for a number of years threshed the grain for all the farmers of this neighborhood. Their machinery was up-to-date in every particular, and they later purchased one of the most complete and latest improved steam threshers, which greatly multiplied their capacity and lessened their labor. In 1890 they inaugurated a sawmill business in Birch Creek Canyon, seventeen miles east of Preston, running the mills mostly in the winter months. This has proven a paying enterprise and has also been of great advantage to the community in which it operates, and throughout a large extent of the surrounding country. The firm owns a considerable stock in both of the irrigating canals which are in use through this section, and it has about 1,260 acres of valuable land, thirty acres of which are reserved as residence property at Preston. Much of the residue is under good irrigation and active cultivation, and some is cultivated by “dry farming” with good results. They are conducting the largest farming business in this part of Cache Valley. The gentlemen of this enterprising firm are all representative men, having a high place in the public regard and a commanding influence in the public life of the county (“Joseph Roper,” Progressive Men of Bannock, Bear Lake, Bingham, Fremont and Oneida Counties, Idaho [A. W. Bowen & Co., Chicago, 1904] 382).

Legacy of land
The following papers were found among the effects of Louis Johnson. After he passed away, his son Ted kept all of Louis’ papers together in a box and they were found when Ted’s effects were sorted in 2002.   These papers are copies of the original agreement between James Johnson and his sons and son-in-law when they divided up the property that had been homesteaded in Poverty Flat, now known as Winder.  (Thanks to Jerry Johnson who had clear copies made so that they are readable since they had been typed using carbon paper.)

An Agreement, January 1916

An agreement entered into this third day of January, nineteen-hundred and sixteen, between James Johnson, party of the first part, and James E. Johnson, Lawrence Johnson, Louis Johnson, Floyd Johnson, Howard Johnson, and Harrison R. Merrill, parties of the second part.

I, James Johnson do hereby agree to sell to the above named parties of the second part the land described as follows: to James E. Johnson the south eighty and the west half of the northwest forty of the “Daines’ Place,” and the south six and two-thirds acres of the school land situated south of Battle Creek, the hundred acres of the Daines place at $35.50 per acre, and the six and two-thirds acres at $100.00 per acre, totaling in all $4,216.66; and to Harrison R. Merrill the east half of the northwest forty and the northeast forty of the Daines Place, and also the south forty of the Sharp Place, and the second six and two-thirds acres of the school land numbering from the south, the 100 acres of the Winder land at $35.00 per acre and the 6 2/3 acres at $100.00 per acre, totaling in all $4,166.66;

To Floyd Johnson the three north forties of the Sharp Place at $33.50 per acre, and the 6 2/3 acres of the school land, totaling in all $4,627.26;

To Howard Johnson the Fellow’s eighty and thirty acres on the south side of the southeast forty of the Butch Thurston Place, and six acres on the north side of the northeast forty of the Sim Thurston Place at $35.005 per acre and 6 2/3 acres of the School Land at $100.00 totaling $4,727.24;

To Louis Johnson thirty-four acres on the south side of the northeast forty, and the middle forty of the Sim Thurston Place, and the north forty of the Hawkes Homestead, at $36.005 per acre, and the fifth 6 2/3 acres of the School Land at $100.00 per acre, totaling $4,699.22;

To Laurence Johnson the south forty of the Sim Thurston Place, the middle forty and thirty-two acres on the north side of the south eighty of the Hawkes Homestead at $36.005 per acre, and the north 6 2/3 acres of the School Land at $100.00 per acre, totaling $4,699.22;

Of the Company’s chattels the different things were sold as follows:

For harnesses James E. Johnson and Howard Johnson each owes H.R. Merrill seven dollars; and Louis Johnson and Laurence Johnson each owes Floyd Johnson seven dollars.

For horses Louis Johnson owes each other member of the company $20.80.

For horses Howard Johnson owes each other member of the company $25.00.
For wagons Louis Johnson owes each other member of the company $6.65.
For wagons Laurence Johnson owes each other member of the company $8.85.
For plows James E. Johnson and Howard Johnson each owes H.R. Merrill $13.30.
For plows Louis and Laurence Johnson each owes Floyd Johnson $13.30.

Louis Johnson is to maintain the telephone, but if at any time it is sold each member of the company is to received one-sixth of the sale price.

With the school land each man gets sixteen ($16.00) dollars water right for each acre of land he owns, taking the water from both the Mink Creek and the Cub River ditches.

The water owned in the reservoir and in the Oneida Ditch by the company will be divided equally among the six men—James E., Laurence, Louis, Floyd, Howard Johnson, and Harrison R. Merrill.

Statement of Financial condition.

Mortgages:

Miller and Veill———————————- $800.00  Roper place
Miller & Veill———————————– $1000.00
Utah Mortgage———————————- $2000.00   @ 9%
Utah Mortgage———————————- $1200.00   @ 9%
Preston Schools——————————— $2000.00
Bank on Notes———————————- $2750.00
Due Mrs. Roper——————————– $3310.00
Due Fose Brothers on note——————- $300.00
Pacific Bldg and Loan Ass.———————— $1777.50

Total                                                  $15,137.50

James Johnson’s own land and Mortgages which the six boys took over in connection with the Roper land:

Miller & Veill           $600.00
Idaho State    $1400.00    @ 9%

We are to pay to James Johnson
For the Forty acres of school land $400.00

For the Daines land             $5600.
For the Fellows land                        $2400.
Total                      $8000
Less $2000.00 mortgage                  $6000.00
Total amount to pay for the Roper                       __________
and the Johnson land                  $27,137.50

Of this amount we are to pay the $4000.00 and the $6000.00 mentioned above to James Johnson. The interest on this ten thousand dollars until paid shall be 7%

Signed   [Lines are spaced for signatures of all involved]

Idaho Judge Heads 4 Generation Family
(from a Preston newspaper August 1936)

Preston—Four generations gathered at the home of Judge James Johnson’s daughter in Preston last week on the occasion of his return from his first visit to Yellowstone park. The four generations were Judge James Johnson, Laurence Johnson, his son; Leeral Johnson his grandson and Nolan Leeral Johnson twenty-one months old his great-grandson.

Although Judge Johnson has lived almost in the shadow of the park all his life he has never actually visited it until this summer. As a young man of nineteen he was doing contracting work on the railroad in Montana, later he served as senator from Oneida county at the time the county was divided. He has served as president of the Oneida Irrigation district, counselor in a ward bishopric, in the Oneida stake presidency and as a missionary to Denmark. His life has been full of activity but never did his work or his pleasure lead him to America’s playground until this year.

During the latest election Judge Johnson was the only Republican elected to any office in his county. Though he was nearing his seventy-sixth birthday his long service to his community has been such both in secular and religious capacities that the people gave him a vote of confidence. Judge Johnson is in court practically every week day.

Judge Johnson is the father of six sons and three daughters nearly all of whom live in Preston, the family home town. He has one son in Rigby, Idaho, a daughter in Provo and another daughter in Milford.

Couple Celebrates their Golden Wedding Anniversary
(from a Preston newspaper December 1930)

Approximately sixty people, relatives and descendants of Mr. and Mrs. James Johnson sat down to a dinner in honor of their Golden Wedding Anniversary on December 23rd at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas K. Greaves.

Of the guests 7 were sons and daughters; four were brother and sisters of Mrs. Johnson; three were brothers and sisters of Mr. Johnson and others were wives and husbands of the relatives or grandchildren.

All of the children of the couple except Dr. Floyd Johnson of Rigby and Mrs. Hazel Christensen of Milford, Utah were present.

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson were married in the old Endowment House in Salt Lake City, December 23rd, 1880. They made the journey from Hyde Park in a new 3¼ Peter Schooner wagon drawn by a team of horses. They spent two days on the trip, stopping the first night at Brigham City. They were accompanied by Olive Lamb, Mrs. Johnson’s sister who later married Joseph Johnson, a brother of the groom. And by Homer Woolf and his fiancée who married on the same day.

To the couple have been born ten children, nine of whom are living. They are James E., Laurence, Edna, Louis, Floyd, Howard, Harriet, Hazel and Orene and Gloyd, a twin of Floyd, who died in infancy. All of the living children are married and have become the parents of thirty grandchildren, the majority of whom were present at the celebration.

Erastus, George and John Lamb of Hyde Park, brothers of Mrs. Johnson, and Susie Hawkes of Preston, a sister, with their partners: Joseph Johnson, Lorenzo Johnson, and Samuel Jenson, brothers and in-laws of Mr. Johnson, with their partners were present.

After the dinner the group assembled in the parlor and living room of the Greaves home where a program given by members of the family was conducted by James Johnson, eldest son of the couple.

James Johnson has been identified with many projects of importance in northern Cache Valley. He has worked untiringly for the advancement of his community be it civil and religious capacities.

He has represented his county as Senator, has been president of one of the most important irrigation companies, has been a lumberman and thresherman and has also conducted farming operations on a large scale. He was a contractor for the railroad before he was twenty.

He has filled a mission to Denmark, has been a member of the bishopric of his ward, a high councilor in Oneida Stake and a member of the stake presidency.

His wife, Harriet E. Lamb is a daughter of Sewel Lamb and herself a pioneer.

Letters from Harriet Johnson to Daughter Hazel Christensen

(Some spelling corrected and punctuation added)

Preston, Idaho. Jan. 30 (1922)

Dear Hazel,
I guess you will think we have forgotten you it has been so long since I wrote to you.  I suppose you are home from Provo by now. I was so glad to hear that you was down there, you would have had such a good time.  I have been to R.S. meeting tonight.  We meet with the priesthood and have such big turnouts.  Father’s slave just called me up to tell me that Father wouldn’t be home before Wed. I think he has deserted me. I went out with Jim and Annie Saturday night and stayed until meeting time Sunday.  When I got home the water was frozen. I had quite a time to thaw it out.  Annie’s girls are here with me.  Dorothy moved home, she will come and stay with me for little while the latter part of March.  I guess you know what for.  Elvira is still alive but very low.  They thought she was dying last night but she got a little better again, but I don’t think she can last much longer.  Hattie went and stayed with her all day today.  They have one woman stay there every day to help the nurse and two set up every night.  They are agoing to put on the MIA play tomorrow night.  Guelda is the maid.  Got a letter from Howard today, they are well.  I will close with much love.
Mother

Preston Idaho,
Mar 4 [1922]

Dear Hazel,
I will write a few lines to let you know that we are still on the map.  Hattie got a letter from you yesterday and we got one from Edna. She says Paul and Ruby are [now] Joy and Hazel. She has to call them that all the time. McEntire’s have moved into our back part of the house. You wanted to know who helped me move your Father did he helped me two days and I was alone one it took us three days.  We have the north room for the kitchen.  We are as cozy as two bugs in a rug. We went to see Aunt Susan last Tuesday. She is quite bad she thinks she won’t live long.  Helen is sick too.  The

Wolford girl still lives with them. Father and I went to Sunday School then to meeting and then we went over to Uncle Joes and then to Sister Merrills and while we were there a fire alarm sounds. It was the first ward meeting house but it didn’t burn long nor do much damage.  I haven’t made that sample of tatting yet to send you. I saw such a pretty little dress on Ethel Spougeberg’s baby. It was double tatted wheels joined together to make a dickey and wheels on around the neck and double tatting around the bottom and it’s name is Joyce.  But maybe you wouldn’t like that kind on account of being on the neck.  It would be pretty that way with scallops around the bottom with double tatting.  If you think you would like that wait until we see each other or Hattie will draw a pattern for you.  How are you now? Is your appetite any better?  I often wish you could call in and eat a meal with us it would be a change.  Father is ready for bed so I will say good night with much love Mother

March 23, 1922

Dear Hazel,
We received your letter the other day or Hattie did and it is my turn to answer it.  I have been slufing lately and left all the writing for Hattie.  We sure are having a dose of Flu.  I went and stayed with Jim’s folks five days they were quite sick all had it except Edith.  I came home Saturday night and washed Monday and was Ironing Tues then thought I could have quite a rest but before I was through with my Ironing along came Dorothy and her children with the Flu for me to take care of.  And Lou stayed home alone and has the flu also he has been quite sick but is better today.  He hadn’t anyone to do anything for him.  We phoned and asked Will S. to do his chores and he is.  They are all getting better.  June and Roma both had it too but are well again.  Selma went home to day she was here two weeks.  We have nice weather here too.  You say everybody there has the spring fever.  It is the summer complaint they have here.  The snow is almost gone.  It sure seems nice.  You said for us to come down in Apr.  I sure will if I can.  Have you seen your Father yet?  He has been down there ever since Monday.  I will say good night with love, Mother.

Preston, Idaho, Nov. 19, (1922)

Dear Hazel and family,
I have a little time before meeting so will write you a few lines.  We got your letter a few days ago.  Hattie’s family have all been sick.  She first had a bad cold and cankor.  Todd has an awful cough and Melvin has croup.  He was quite bad last night, had a high fever, we were worried about him but he is much better this morning.  You wanted to know about Selma.  Nephi Larsen, the truck man, took her and their furniture so she couldn’t stop off to see you.  They were 9 hours, on the way his brother in law was riding on top of the load was agoing to Ogden.  He fell off the load between here and Logan.  They went on quite a long way before they missed him and that put them back 2 hours.   He went to sleep was why he fell.  Rose has Typhoid fever.  She has been in bed ever since Selma got there.  They sent for her mother two or three weeks ago, she is still down there.  The last I hear she was a little better.  The black smith Jorgensen’s wife died this morning.  She had a baby a few days ago and it only lived a short time.  You wanted to know if there are so many babies dying here.  There has been several.  Dora Wilcox’s 6 month old baby died with bowel trouble.  They feel very bad about it.   Peter Hansen’s new born baby died.  States girls would have liked a girl but George is tickled to death about him.  I don’t know what she and Doc wanted. They don’t know what to name him.  Geo wants him named Harry, the girls want Gorden, they talk of Gilbert.  So you and Joy are the Uncle Nels and Aunt Carry hope he will do well at his job.  What in the world is the matter with the baby to stay awake so long at night?  Do you try going to bed with him?  I sure would like to see the little chap. The new sugar factory is running.  Father is still working there.  They started up last Wed.  Orene is hauling beets from the beet dump by Uncle Will’s down to the factory.  They say Howard has a good job, one he likes fine.  Gets $3.75 a day, he is feeling pretty good. rite soon,
Love to all
Mother

Orene will make about $5.00 a day.

P.S. I forgot tell you Clyde Daines is teaching here in the high school.  He had been staying with Aunt Susie but is moving his family here in part of Wm Daine’s house.  He likes the school fine, says he would like to live in Preston for good.

Preston, Feb. 4, 1923

Dear Hazel,
We received your letter a few days ago, but I have been careless about answering it.  We are all well are having a spell of winter colder than any this winter.  We still have our bed upstairs the winter is getting so far along I think we will keep it up there.  We got a letter from Orene a few days ago he said he thought he would go to Magna.  My ink is gone so I will have to finish with a pencil.  I hope Orene can get work in Magna.  I feel worried to have him in Brigham it is such a rough place.  We got a letter from Edna today they were well.  Their house is sold to a Mr. Gibson they say they are nice people.  We had a big R. S. party Friday, set three tables the length of and had a hot dinner boiled chicken and gravy, mashed potatoes, canned corn, cabbage salad, cucumber and beet pickles, rolls, cake and ice cream.  Had toasts and funny speeches all during the dinner.  Then started dancing about 6:30 oclock and went home at eleven.   Selma said she hadn’t been to see you yet.  She says their money is all bargained for before they get it so she dont like to use it to sport with.  She sent me a letter last week she said Orene had been there so she wrote to tell me.  I was so glad to get it because I hadn’t heard from him for so long.  You asked me if Albert Eccles is married.  I dont know.  Floyd, Clara and I went and called on Clyde Daines and wife this afternoon after meeting.  They seemed quite glad to see us.  She seems quite a nice woman.  Annies girls are staying with us.  They sleep in Orene’s bed.  Well I dont think of any thing more to write so good night.  Your loving Mother

the meeting house Copco, Cal.
Nov 29, 1924

Dear Hazel,
I received your welcome letter yesterday. One from Floyd and a thanksgiving card from Roma.  It was a cute little card.  She said Aunt Hazel and Uncle Joy were agoing to spend thanksgiving with them.  And I got a letter from Hattie the day before.  We keep her busy looking after our affairs but she seems patient about it.  Orene is working at carpenter work now with a bridge gang.  He gets $6.00 a day.  Dont you think that is fine for such a young boy?  We have been afraid he might run up against something he dont understand and be fired but he says he is getting along all right.  He has worked 5 days at it.  He will be more contented now he hasn’t had a very good job and only $4.00 and there are always some fellows telling them that they could do better down farther in Cal.  He would have gone if it hadn’t been for leaving us but he said he would stay here until spring but now he says he will stay a year if the work lasts that long and he can keep that job.  Floyd and Clara said they were agoin to Provo for thanksgiving.  We thought Edna would be so disappointed because you wasnt agoing but if they were there that would make up for you not going or partly anyway.  I should think you would go for Christmas.  Jennie Winn got word yesterday that her Father died the night before.  She seemed to feel quite sad.  Still she was expecting to hear it most any time.  She isn’t agoing home.  She dont seem very strong and has a young baby.  The trip would be awful hard and she wouldnt be in time for the funeral.  She says she will send her mother some money instead.  I should think Bertha could soon take care of herself.  We are still having nice weather.  A little cold at nights.  Father is working overtime tonight and 2 nights before.  He makes $9.00 a day when he does. Lovingly, Mother

Preston, Idaho,
Mr 2, 1925

Dear Hazel,
When I got home Saturday night there was a letter from you. We are over here at Lou’s fixing our car. Lou is helping his Father.  They are fixing his car too.  We were here most of last week and it will take a few more days.  I sure was glad to hear from you.  I have been intending to write sooner but we go visiting so much it takes up all of my time.  We went out to Jim’s last Monday night and they made us stay all night.  Todd and Hattie are over on their farm.  They think they will stay 2 weeks. They are doing chores for Seymour so that he and wife can have a little lay off they were so homesick.  Melvin is at home so he can go to school.  We may go out and stay with Hattie a few days when we get through here.  I was glad to hear from Mrs. Cates but I would like to know what she meant about Walaces.  She said she expected Mrs. Lauritzen had told us.  I sure hope nothing is wrong with them.  Orene is working on a chicken ranch about 50 miles from San Francisco but it is about two weeks since he wrote. Leon came home the other day.  He was out of work for a while.  He intends to go back again but dont know just when.  He says Orene has been over and slept with him several times.  He got a letter from him just before he left.  Says he told him he likes his job fine.  Arther Dofford was operated on the other day.  He had an abcess or something of the kind on his intestines and it broke and made a hole the size of a quarter.  He is in a critical condition but seems to be getting along as well as could be expected.  He is at Nancy Becksteads hospital.  We sure had a fine trip home didnt get a bit cold.  I was wishing you had been with us.  Kiss your two little rascals for me.  Much love to all. Mother

Heirloom Diamond Lace

Created by the Lamb sisters  (as recorded by Hazel Johnson Christensen and updated by Beth Breinholt and Annalee Barajas)

Use size 0 needles and fine cotton crochet thread.
Key: W-1 Widen one: knit in front and back of same stitch
W-2 Widen two: knit in front and back, and again in front of stitch
K: knit                        N: knit 2 together
O: thread over          Sl: slip a stitch
S: stitch
Numbers in parentheses at the end of the row indicate how many stitches are on the needle when that row is finished.

Follow rows as numbered.

Pattern:  Cast on 26, Knit across.

Row 1: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K5, NO, K1, ON, K6, W-1, ON, W-2 (29).

Row 2: Sl 1, K3, ON, K18, ON, ON, K1 (29).

Row 3: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K4, NO, K3, ON, K6, W-1, ON, K2, W-2 (32).

Row 4: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K20, ON, ON, K1 (28).

Row 5: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K3, NO, K1, NO, K2, ON, K6, W-1, ON, W-2 (31).

Row 6: Sl 1, K3, ON, K20, ON,   ON, K1 (31).

Row 7: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K2, NO, K1, NO, K1, ON, K1, ON, K6, W-1, ON, K2, W-2 (34).

Row 8: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K22, ON, ON, K1 (30).

Row 9: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K1, NO, K1, NO, K3, ON, K1, ON, K6, W-1, ON, K1, W-2 (33).

Row 10: Sl 1, K3, ON, K22, ON, ON, K1 (33).

Row 11: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K3, ON, K1, O, K3 together, O, K1, NO, K2, NO, pick up stitch, K it, ON, K3, W-1, ON, K2, W-2 (37).

Row 12: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K25, ON, ON, K1 (33).

Row 13: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K4, ON, K1, Sl 1, O, K1, NO, K2, NO, K3, ON, K3, W-1, ON, W-2 (37).

Row 14: Sl 1, K3, ON, K 16, N, K8, ON, ON, K1 (36).

Row 15: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K5, ON, K1, NO, K2, NO, K1, NO, K2, ON, K3, W-1, ON, K2, W-2 (39).

Row 16: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K27, ON, ON, K1 (35).

Row 17: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K6, O, K3 together, O, K2, NO, K1, NO, K1, ON, K1, ON, K3, W-1, ON, W-2 (38).

Row 18: Sl 1, K3, ON, K27, ON, ON, K1 (38).

Row 19: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K7, ON, K1, NO, K1, NO, K3, ON, K1, ON, K3, W-1, ON, K2, W-2 (41).

Row 20: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K29, ON, ON, K1 (37).

Row 21: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K5, NO,   K1, ON, K2, ON, K1, O, K3 together, O, K1, NO, K2, NO, Pick up stitch, K it, ON, W-1, ON, W-2 (41).

Row 22: Sl 1, K3, ON, K30, ON, ON, K1 (41).

Row 23: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K4, NO, K3, ON, K2, ON, K1, Sl 1, O, K1, NO, K2, NO, K3, ON,  W-1, ON, K2, W-2 (45).

Row 24: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K14, N, K17, ON, ON, K1 (40).

Row 25: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K3, NO, K1, NO, K2, ON, K2, ON, K1, NO, K2, NO, K1, NO, K2, ON,  W-1, ON, W-2 (43).

Row 26: Sl 1, K3, ON, K32, ON, ON, K1 (43).

Row 27: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K2, NO, K1, NO, K1, ON, K1, ON, K2, O, K3 together, O, K2, NO, K1, NO, K1, ON, K1, ON, W-1, ON, K2, W-2 (46).

Row 28: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K34, ON, ON, K1 (42).

Row 29: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K1, NO, K1, NO, K3, ON, K1, ON, K2, ON, K1, NO, K1, NO, K3, ON, K1, ON, W-1, ON, W-2 (45).

Row 30: Sl 1, K3, ON, K34, ON, ON, K1 (45).

Row 31: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K3, ON, K1, O, K3 together, O, K1, NO, K2, NO, K1, ON, K2, ON, K1, O, K3 together, O, K1, NO, K2, NON, K2, W-2 (46).

Row 32: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K34, ON, ON, K1 (42).

Row 33: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K4, ON, K1, Sl 1, O, K1, NO, K2, NO, K3, ON, K2, ON, K1, Sl 1, O, K1, NO, K2, NON, W-2 (45).

Row 34: Sl 1, K3, ON, K5, N, K17, N, K8, ON, ON, K1 (43).

Row 35: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K5, ON, K1, NO, K2, NO, K1, NO, K2, ON, K2, ON, K1, NO, K2, NON, K2, W-2 (44).

Row 36: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K32, ON, ON, K1 (40).

Row 37: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K6, O, K3 together, O, K2, NO, K1, NO, K1, ON, K1, ON, K2, O, K3 together, O, K2, NON, W-2 (41).

Row 38: Sl 1, K3, ON, K30, ON, ON, K1 (41).

Row 39: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K7, ON, K1, NO, K1, NO, K3, ON, K1, ON, K2, ON, K1, NON, K2, W-2 (42).

Row 40: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K30, ON, ON, K1 (38).

Row 41: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K5, NO, K1, ON, K2, ON, K1, O, K3 together, O, K1, NO, K3, N, K1, NON, W-2 (38).

Row 42: Sl 1, K3, ON, K27, ON, ON, K1 (38).

Row 43: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K4, NO, K3, ON, K2, ON, K1, Sl 1, O, K1, NO, K5, NON, K2, W-2 (40).

Row 44: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K9, N, K17, ON, ON, K1 (35).

Row 45: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K3, NO, K1, NO, K2, ON, K2, ON, K1, NO, K5, NON, W-2 (36).

Row 46: Sl 1, K3, ON, K25, ON, ON, K1 (36).

Row 47: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K2, NO, K1, NO, K1, ON, K1, ON, K2, O, K3 together, O, K5, NON, K2, W-2 (37).

Row 48: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K25, ON, ON, K1 (33).

Row 49: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K1, NO, K1, NO, K3, ON, K1, ON, K2, ON, K4, NON, W-2 (34).

Row 50: Sl 1, K3, ON, K23, ON, ON, K1 (34).

Row 51: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K3, ON, K1, O, K3 together, O, K1, NO, K3, N, K4, NON, K2, W-2 (34).

Row 52: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K22, ON, ON, K1 (30).

Row 53: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K4, ON, K1, Sl 1, O, K1, NO, K8, NON, W-2 (32).

Row 54: Sl 1, K3, ON, K11, N, K8, ON, ON, K1 (31).

Row 55: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K5, ON, K1, NO, K8, NON, K2, W-2 (32).

Row 56: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K20, ON, ON, K1 (28).

Row 57: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K6, O, K3 together, O, K8, NON, W-2 (29).

Row 58: Sl 1, K3, ON, K18, ON, ON, K1 (29).

Row 59: Sl 1, K1, ON, ON, K7, ON, K7, NON, K2, W-2 (30).

Row 60: Bind off 4, K1, ON, K18, ON, ON, K1 (26).

(For a graphic pattern of heirloom lace, see pdf available for download on this site.)

Missionary Journal of James Johnson

This is a complete manuscript of James Johnson’s journal written while on his mission.  Much of the spelling and punctuation has been standardized, and for greater clarity, Bill Murri also added many translations from the Danish. These are in brackets. Original journal is found in Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University Archives MSS SC 2615.

James Johnson
Preston, Oneida County, Idaho
Departed for mission to Denmark 10 October 1900; Returned 19 February 1903.

Oct 6, 1900 I left Preston for Salt Lake.

Oct 7 I attended Conference.

Oct 8 I attended priesthood meeting in the forenoon and was set apart by Apostle Grant and Taylor and Clawson, Grant being mouth.

Oct 9 At 10 pm I left the D. and R. G. W. Station. I arrived at Chicago on the morning of the [Oct] 12 at 9 am and stayed there ‘til 10 at night.

Oct 13 I got to Buffalo and stopped there 8 hours. I went over to the Niagara Falls and on the night of the 13, I left Buffalo. On the morning of [Oct] 14 at 10:40 I arrived at Boston. In the afternoon I visited the Ship Commonwealth, the ship I will cross the ocean on.

Oct 14 was Sunday. I visited the Bunker Hill Battlefield and Monument and also a part of Charleston and a part of Boston.

Oct 15 at 9 am I visited the Navy Yard Harbor. I saw the Olympia Dueyes Flag Ship. In the afternoon I went through the Mass. State house.

Oct 16, 1900 In South Boston in a nice little park in the resident part of the city. This is the finest part of the city. The buildings are brick, five stories high and look like one big building for miles. This is a quiet part of town and is kept clean, not a speck of manure is left five minutes. I am sitting on the steps of the Boston Monument resting in a large park. I went on board the Commonwealth at Boston at 8:05 pm.

Oct 16, 1900 I went on board at 10:00.

Oct 17 I left the docks at 6 am. At 10 am I was very sick. At 12 our crew picked up four men that were on a wrecked schooner.

Oct 18 I am well and feeling fine. Have been able to eat my meals. Traveled 345 miles.

Oct 19, 1900 Third day out. I see 3 sailing vessels and one steamer. I have been well. The weather has been cloudy but the sea has been calm. We have on board 300 passengers and all is well on board. I went through the engine room today and the 3rd class department.

Oct 20 4th day out. I am well. Today the weather is cloudy and is raining. We traveled 350 miles the last twenty four hours. The ship I am on cost $2,750,000.00 and it has 11,000 or 13,000 genuine horse power engines. We eat four times a day.

Oct 21st I am in mid-ocean and the waves are running 30 ft high. I got wet. The water went over the deck. It is very foggy. The fog horn is blowing every 5 minutes.

Oct 22 The weather is still rough. The waves go over the boat all the time. The boys are all sea sick.

Oct 23 The weather is fine this morning. The weather has been fine all day. I have been able to eat 4 meals today. Have had 2 gospel chats with strangers.

Oct 24 The sea is smooth today and pleasant to be on deck. Have had a gospel conversation this morning. I am well. We sighted land at 2 am and at 6 pm stopped at Queensdown.

Oct 25 I landed at Liverpool at 10 am. I had a good trip.  Elder James G. Smith met us at the dock, I slept with him that night. We had a good chat.

Oct 26 I left Liverpool for Grimsby, arrived at 6:30 and set sail at 8 pm.

Oct 27 I woke up and was on the North Sea and the Sea was very rough and I was sick and remained so all day.

Oct 28 I arrived at Hamburg at 2:50 am and at 9:57 I left for Kale and arrived there at 11 am and then I took the steamer for Korsor [Denmark] and arrived at 4 pm and then took the train for Copenhagen. Arrived there at 6:57 pm.

Oct 29 I attended priesthood meeting and Sunday School union. I enjoyed myself very much in attending the meeting.

Oct 30 I visited around with James Christensen in Copenhagen.

Oct 31 I visited the round tower.

Nov 1 I left Copenhagen for the Ålborg Conference and arrived there 10:45 pm.

Nov 2 I visited the market place and saw the marketing of people and the city of Ålborg.

Nov 3 Visited around the city.

Nov 4 was Sunday. I attended Sunday School at 10 am and 11 am. I attended fast meeting as it was fast day. At 2 pm, I attended meeting again and was called to preach. This was the first time I ever spoke in the danish language. I also attended meeting in the evening.

Nov 5 I received my appointment. I was assigned to labor in the Arden Branch with Elder Neils Jacobson of Newton, Cache Co. I also attended priesthood meeting.

Nov 6 I left Aalborg [Ålborg] for Arden which is my headquarters. I arrived here at 4 pm. I had a good visit with a family at night by the name of Niels Krogh.

Nov 7 I visited 3 families who are investigators. We held a conversation with them. I returned home and spent the night studying the language and the scriptures.

Nov 8 Stormy. Stayed around the house all day and studied the danish.

Nov 9 Stormy. Stayed in the house, had a conversation with an inner mission preacher, he agreed with us in everything.

Nov 10 We visited 4 families and invited them to come to meeting and held 5 gospel conversations.

Nov 11 was Sunday. We had meeting at Niels Krogh’s house at 2 pm. Elder Christensen was the first speaker. He spoke on the first principles of the gospel. I was the second speaker and Elder Jacobsen bore his testimony. At night, I in connection with Brother Christensen, visited a family in Store Arden and held a conversation with them and after I returned home I visited a family of Fredricksen and had a conversation with them.

Nov 12 I spent the day in writing and reading.

Nov 13 I done the same.

Nov 14 I spent part of the day reading and a part in visiting a family in Store Arden by invitation and had a gospel conversation with them and gave them some tracts and they invited us to call again.

Nov 15 I spent the day studying. At night I visited a family by invitation.

Nov 16 I spent the day indoors as it was raining and at night I visited a family by invitation and had a fine time. I had a good gospel conversation with the man of the house.

Nov 17 is very stormy. Stayed in doors all day. At night I visited a family and had a conversation with them and they invited us to call again.

Nov 18 It is Sunday and stormy. No meeting today but a visit tonight.

Nov 19 The weather is clear and cold. Heavy frost last night, the first of the season.

Nov 20 It was my 41 birthday and I stayed in the house.

Nov 21 and 22 Nothing done, stormy.

Nov 23 Stormy. I visited one house and had a gospel conversation.

Nov 24 I went to Ålborg and walked to Skerfyz [perhaps Skörping north of Arden?] there I visited 4 houses and gave them tracts then took the train to Ålborg.

Nov 25 I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings in Ålborg.

Nov 27 I received my new appointment to go to Skagen and new companion, James Larson of Bench, Wyoming.

Nov 28 I went to Arden and got my trunk and back to Ålborg again and at 3:50 I went to Frederikshavn and arrived there at 8 and attended a meeting. I had a chance to preach.

Nov 29 I went to the docks to see 2 Elders that were going to Norway. In the afternoon I had a headache.

Nov 30 I went out tracting and deposited 38 tract and had a gospel conversation, this was my first trial. I visited 18 houses and there was 2 families that would not receive a tract.

Dec 1 I visited 2 houses and walked 12 miles and attended priesthood meeting at night.

Dec 2 was Sunday. I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings. It was a testimony meeting and a good one.

Dec 3 Elder Andreasen and I went to Strandby and distributed a few tracts and then we went to Elling Mose and held a meeting at night at Holmen Smadan and went back home.

Dec 4 Stormy. I wrote 3 letters and then we made up a Christmas program.

Dec 5 I walked 12 miles and got wet.

Dec 6 I walked 10 miles and got home at 4 in the afternoon. I visited 2 houses and gave 1 tract away.

Dec 7 I visited out in the town and visited 6 houses and gave 12 tracts away.

Dec 8 Brother Mateson and I visited Strandby and hired the church to hold meeting tomorrow. We had to pay 2 crowns for the house.

Dec 9 Sunday I attended Sunday School in Frederikshavn and I went to Strandby and attended meeting in the church and then returned home and held meeting at home again.

Dec 10 I was reading all day.

Dec 11 I went to Skagen to make arrangements for a place to stay.

Dec 12 I rented a place to live. I had to pay 25 kroner [crowns] for 3 months. It rained all day and I got wet. When I got all the necessary arrangements I returned to Frederikshavn again. There was a letter for me from home, the first for weeks. I was very pleased to hear from home.

Dec 13 I spent the day in writing letters to Harriet Johnson and Louis and Joseph Johnson and in studying the gospel.

Dec 14 I did some tracting. I distributed 25 tracts and had 3 gospel conversations and visited 8 houses and we visited the court house and they examined each of us separate and then we were turned loose at night. We went to Hans C. Sorensen’s and blessed their baby and had supper and then we administered to the baby. This was my first trial to be mouth.

Dec 15 Saturday, nothing done.

Dec 16 Sunday I attended Sunday School at 10. At 2 pm meeting I preached a few minutes and at night at 7:30 I attended meeting again and talked to the saints again. I fasted all day.

Dec 17 I had a good Danish dinner at Brother and Sister Petterson’s and then I got ready to flee from the police.

Dec 18 I arrived at Ålborg at 8:20 last night. I gave 2 tracts away on the train. I do wish they would let me settle down and not chase me all over Denmark.

Dec 19 I spent writing letters.

Dec 20 I went to Svenstrup and I went and got my book bound.

Dec 21 I went to Brönderslev to spend Christmas.

Dec 22 I done nothing.

Dec 23 Sunday I attended meeting at night and talked to the Saints.

Dec 24 I sat in the house all day with Brother Petterson. He was sick. I ate Christmas Eve supper with Christen Simsensen of Brönderslev.

Dec 25 I was in the house all day.

Dec 26 I wrote letters and studied the gospel and administered to Sister Olsen.

Dec 27 I studied the gospel.

Dec 28 I and Elder Pettersen went to east Brönderslev to see if we could get a chance to hold a meeting there but we were refused. We got our jackets wet.

Dec 29 Sunday I spent the day talking to the folk of Brönderslev and attended meeting at night.

Dec 31 I spent the day at home. I ate supper with Sister Kirstene Christensen commonly called Stock Christiena.

Jan 1, 1901 Tuesday I spent in the Brönderslev con house.

Jan 2 Nothing done.

Jan 3 I walked 25 miles and accomplished nothing.

Jan 4 Sick.

Jan 5 Sick. Went to Vesterby and visited some saints and some that were not saints.

Jan 6 Sick in bed.

Jan 7 Sick.

Jan 8 Sick.

Jan 9 I was around the house in the day and at night I and Brother Christensen went to see some temple Swevers [?]. We could do nothing for them for they had the gospel.

Jan 10 I went to Tise with tracts. I visited 22 strangers’ houses and deposited 33 tracts and held 3 gospel conversations and had a good time.

Jan 11 I visited Stenum and did some tracting. I gave out 12 tracts and visited 6 houses and had 3 gospel conversations. The weather is fine.

Jan 12 I went to Christen Jensen’s and helped bless their baby.

Jan 13 Sunday, I attended 2 meetings and spoke in them both and administered the sacrament the first time in Denmark.

Jan 14 I read the bible.

Jan 15 Read the bible.

“ 16 “ “ “

Jan 17 I went to Ålborg to attend the Tombala [Festival]. We had a good time.

Jan 18 I attended priesthood meeting and was appointed to labor in Lögstör branch in connection with P. C. Christensen from Richfield, Utah.

Jan 19 I visited a family in Ålborg and held a gospel conversation and gave them 2 tracts.

Jan 20 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and spoke and attended 2 meetings and spoke in one of them.

Jan 21 Visiting around Ålborg.

Jan 22 I left Ålborg for my new field of labor. I went on the steamboat. We bucked ice all day on the Limfjorden. I arrived in Lögstör at 4 pm and felt fine. I was invited in to Madam Knutsen’s for chocolate in the evening.

Jan 23 I studied the bible and in the evening I visited a family of saints-Larsens.

Jan 24 I went to a town by the name of Ranum and visited a family of saints and administered to the woman of the house and had a gospel conversation with a girl that came in.

Jan 25 I went tracting in Lögstör, gave away 11 tracts and held 4 gospel conversations.

Jan 26 I went to Næsby with the stars [Scandinavian Star – Church magazine] visited some families that are investigating the gospel. We had a good gospel conversation. They were lukewarm.

Jan 27 Sunday, at home all day.

Jan 28 I have been out tracting. I visited 5 houses and gave away 5 tracts and have written 3 letters.

Jan 29, 1901 I spent the day writing.

Jan 30 I went tracting. I visited 9 houses and gave away 13 tracts and had 3 gospel conversations.

Jan 31 I went tracting and had a fine time.

Feb 1, 1901 I visited family Knutsen, who are investigating and talked to them and had a good time together.

Feb 2 The same as the 1.

Feb 3 Was Sunday, I was in the house all day and was visited by a store agent and talked gospel for 3 hours and in the evening I went out to a Larsen family of Saints.

Feb 4 I went tracting with first tract in Lögstör.

Feb 5 Was the same thing over again.

Feb 6 I went to Næsby with the star. We had a good time conversing on the principles of the gospel.

Feb 7 I sat home all day waiting for visitors and reading at night. We had a pleasant call from Miss Olena Jensen and Sister Busk and Miss Knutsen.

Feb 8 I tracted 3 houses in Lögstör.

Feb 9 I visited a family of saints out one mile from Lögstör and delivered the star and visited the women’s parents and preached the gospel to them.

Feb 10 Sunday, I went to Ranum with the store and was invited in the Knutsens and Kjogoish [?] and preached the gospel for 3 hours to Smay Lares [?] and then I went to a family of saints and we had some singing, gospel chats and a general good time.

Feb 11 I was in the house all day studying.

Feb 12 I went out tracting I visited 10 houses and distributed 17 tracts and had 2 gospel conversations.

Feb 13 I studied the bible all day and at night our neighbor woman, Sister Knutsen, came in and talked with us.

Feb 14 I wrote a letter to my dear wife and children.

Feb 15 I went out to Mjallerup and visited a couple of families that are friendly to us but are very careless. Sister Jensen came and cleaned house for us.

Feb 16 Saturday, visited Madam Knutsen and had a gospel conversation with her and family. At night Sister Jensen and Busk came to see us and brought some meat for us.

Feb 17 Sunday, was fast and Brother Christensen and I cooked soup for dinner. Sister Jensen furnished the stews for the soup and came and ate dinner with us. Sister Busk brought us a nice piece of fresh meat so we had enough for 2 days.

Feb 18 I went in to Madam Knutsens in the afternoon and to Larsens in the evening.

Feb 19 I went to Næsby and delivered the stars and at night read the news til 1 in the morning.

Feb 20 I went to Ranum with the stars and at night we had a call from a Swede and had a gospel conversation.

Feb 21 Snowing, I stayed in the house all day and wrote to my dear ones at home.

Feb 22 We visited 3 houses and had 2 gospel conversations and Olena Jensen called on us in the evening.

Feb 23 Saturday, My dear wife’s 39 birthday. May peace and happiness ever attend her and God prepare her for her duties. I dreamt last night that Hatty and Floyd were very sick and I was called in to see them die, but they got better and I fell asleep again and Floyd came and kissed me.

Feb 24 Sunday, I studied the scriptures and visited a Larsen family who are saints and at night Sisters Jensen and Busk gave us a pleasant call.

Feb 25 I had headache and laid on the bed all day. In the evening I visited a family of baptists and loaned them a book and at night I visited our neighbor, a Swede and a widower, and bought a ton of coal.

Feb 26 I read the news in the forenoon and in the afternoon I was invited in to Madam Knutsen, our vertinde [landlady] and had coffee cake and in the evening Sister Busk called on us a few minutes.

Feb 27 Stayed home and read the scriptures.

Feb 28 I walked to Nibe a distance of 20 miles. In the evening we administered to the lady of the house. We supped with a Jensen and had a good time with the saints in Nibe. March 1, 1901 I was in Nibe, nearly all the saints were sick so we stayed over another day with them talking to them and comforting them the best we could.

Mar 2 We arrived in Ålborg in the afternoon. At night I attended a priesthood meeting at which there were 3 members excommunicated and we had some good council from the president, Brother Miller.

Mar 3 Sunday, I was very sick but attended Sunday School and fast meeting in the forenoon but was in bed in the afternoon. At night I again attended meeting and spoke a short time but was very sick and after meeting the Brethren administered to me and I went to sleep.

Mar 4 Monday, I was sick and did nothing but lie around and hate myself.

Mar 5 Tuesday, I was some better. I went to a family of Petersens to dinner with the president and had a good time conversing on the gospel and the lady said she was ready for baptism.

Mar 6 Wednesday, I went back to Nibe on our way home again. I was not feeling any too good yet. In the evening I visited a Fröken [young lady] Khölby and had a very good time.

Mar 7 Thursday, I am still in Nibe. I visited a Sister Sorensen and a family Len Becks and Sorensen’s and conversed on the principles of the gospel with them.

Mar 8 Friday, I left Nibe for home. I walked to Lundbæk and visited Brother Miller’s brother and then took the train from there to Blære and then walked to Kornum to look for a girl that we had a letter for but she was not home. From there we walked to Lögstör a distance of 4 miles and got home just after dark.

Mar 9 Saturday, I wrote my journal and visited our vertinde [landlady] at night.

Mar 10 Sunday, I went to Ranum to attend a birthday of brother Busk’s and deliver the stars.

Mar 11 Monday, I went tracting and visited 13 houses and gave away 21 tracts but could not get a conversation.

Mar 12 Tuesday, I visited Næsby and delivered the stars and had a chat with the people.

March 13 I was a little under the weather in the forenoon and in the afternoon I went tracting and gave away 11 tracts and visited 12 houses.

March 14, 1901 I was in the house all day and wrote 2 letters.

March 15 I went and hired the Afholds hjem [home] to hold a meeting in on March 22 and at night I visited a Swede, Gamle [old] Hans.

March 16 Saturday, I wrote 3 letters and studied the scriptures.

March 17 Sunday, I was in Knutsens and conversed with them and in the afternoon I went out Skörbæk to Larsens, a family of saints.

March 18 Monday, I went out tracting I gave away 28 tracts and visited 27 houses and had time with a intermishoner [indre mission] priest but we could not agree.

March 19 Tuesday, I went tracting and inviting people to meeting. I visited 34 houses and gave away 35 tracts and had 4 gospel conversations.

March 20 Wednesday, I and Brother Christensen went down on the beach gathering shells and to practice songs for our meeting.

March 21 Thursday, I went to the docks to meet our president. He came to help us hold meeting.

March 22 Friday, Brother Miller, the president, and Brother Christensen and I visited the people in Næsby and in Ranum and at night we held a meeting in the Afholds hjem [home]. This was the first meeting I presided over in Denmark. We had a good meeting, about 60 persons present and after meeting we had chocolate back at Madam Knudsen’s and had a good time preaching the gospel to them.

March 23 Saturday, I went to the docks with Brother Miller and in the afternoon I was sick.

March 24 Sunday, I was invited to dinner by our landlady, Madam Knudsen. We had a fine dinner and in the afternoon we held meeting with the saints and we had a good time together. This was our first meeting alone.

Mar 25 Monday, I wrote letters to my dear ones at home and to Jo Sharp and wife.

March 26 I was in the house all day reading the news and the be cube [?].

March 27 I walked from Lögstör to Valsted on my route to conference. I stayed overnight with C. Sorensen.

March 28 I walked from Valsted to Nibe in a heavy snowstorm. I had a good time while there. I stayed with Jensens and all the saints of Nibe were there. We sang songs and chatted on the principles of gospel and had a fine time.

March 29 I went to Ålborg on the train.

March 30 Saturday, I made up my report in the day time and at night conference commenced.

Mar 31 Sunday, 1 meeting in the hall and 2 in National Hotel. All the Elders had a chance to speak. President Petersen was present with us.

April 1 Monday, I attended Priesthood meeting all day and we had a fine time. We all went back to our old fields with a good spirit.

April 2, 1901 Tuesday, I visited around Ålborg with the saints.

April 3 The same and wrote a letter to my dear ones at home.

April 4 Thursday, I in company with N.P. Johnson of Logan went to Stöhölm and there we stayed over night with Peter Westergaard and had a fine chat with them on the gospel.

April 5 I and Elder Johnson walked from Stöhölm to Huslof to Johnson’s old home and the house where Jane Engall was born.

April 6 I visited around with Elder Johnson among friends and was treated kindly.

April 7 Easter Sunday, We ate dinner with a family of friends by the name of Breim.

April 8 I visited a family by the name of Crin Reace and Andersen and stayed over night with the last named. They were all very kind to us, nothing was too good for us.

April 9 I visited several houses and invited the folks to meeting as we were going to hold a meeting at night. We had a good meeting. The people were well pleased and we had several invitations to go and stay over night.

April 10 I went from Hald to Nyköbing and visited glarmester [glazier] Andersen, Christensen Hansen’s brother, they are well fixed.

April 11 I visited a sister that was in the Church and then walked over Salling Sund and crossed the fure [ditch or water area] at Hvalpsund and stayed with a family at __.

April 12 Friday, I walked from ———- to Lögstör in a rainstorm and on the way we stayed at Brother Baske’s and ate dinner and got home at six and changed clothes and at night visited our landlady and had a good time.

April 13 Saturday, I went to the docks with Brother Johnson and in the afternoon I rested.

April 14 Sunday, I spent the day reading the scriptures.

April 15 Monday, I went out to Næsby and delivered the stars and visited Thomas Hugers and Jensens and preached the gospel to them and tried to show them the need of joining the church (and it rained all day).

April 16 Tuesday, I went to Næsby and delivered the starss and had a good gospel conversation with Thomas Hocker and Jensen.

April 17 Wednesday, I wrote a letter to James Christensen and to L. P. Christensen and was invited in to Knutsens at night.

April 18 Thursday, I went to Ranum and tracked on the road there and back. I visited two houses and gave away 30 tracts.

April 19 Friday, I wrote letters and studied the scriptures.

April 20 Saturday, I sat in the house all day and in the evening I went out on the hill above Lögstör.

April 21 Sunday, We got the papers and I got a letter from Grandma. I spent the day reading the news and letters and at night we visited Knutsens.

April 22 Monday, I went to Næsby and visited 10 houses and gave away 3 tracts.

April 23 I went to Mjallerup tracting and to visit some friends. I visited 11 houses and gave away 14 tracts and one book.

April 24 I stayed in the house all day reading.

April 25 I wrote 4 letters to Harriet, my wife and Edna, James and Louis and at night I visited a family by the name of Thomas Laught living south of Lögstör.

April 26 Friday, I was in the house in the forenoon and in the afternoon I visited a family outside of town.

April 27 Saturday, I went to Ranum and visited Smay Lars and Niels Bushis.

April 28 Sunday, I was invited in to Madam Knutsens and we had a good time. I talked gospel for 9 hours and at night Miss Oline Jensen and Nelesene Me. Busk gave us a call.

April 29 Monday, I was writing letters and studying.

April 30 Tuesday, I was studying the language and the scriptures and in the afternoon I went to the docks and saw them bring in a man that was drowned when the boat tipt with him on the fure up by Nibe.

May 1, 1901 Wednesday, I was in the house all day studying and writing letters to my dear ones at home exhorting them to diligence.

May 2 Thursday, I was invited into our landlady’s, it being her birthday. She was 52 years old. I had a good time talking gospel and other things and had 2 good meals.

May 3 Friday, I went out and visited Sister Larsen’s parents and had a good visit.

May 4 Saturday, I traveled from Lögstör to Ålborg and got there at 4:30 and at night I attended Priesthood meeting and we taught a lady of the church.

May 5 Sunday, Fast day, I attended Sunday School and two meetings and spoke in one of them. There was more of the spirit than I ever saw.

May 6 Monday, I was in Ålborg and visited Larsens in Vejgård and ate dinner and in the afternoon I visited 20 strangers houses and gave away 22 tracts and at night I went to the theatre.

May 7 Tuesday, I started to walk to Nibe and it rained. I came back and tried the train and got left.

May 8 Wednesday, I took the train to Nibe and at night we held a meeting and had a good time.

May 9 Thursday, I visited Sorensens and Bakes and had a good chat with them. I walked back to Ålborg.

May 10 Friday, I was in Ålborg all day and at night I went to Brönderslev and I got a new companion from Ephraim, Utah, by the name of P.C. Sorensen.

May 11 Saturday, I was in Brönderslev visiting with the brethren.

May 12 Sunday, I attended meetings twice and spoke once and ate dinner with a sister by the name of Stock Christeney, a good old soul.

May 13 Monday, I was in Ålborg and attended priesthood meeting in the forenoon and went out tracting in the afternoon and I received a new companion, a man from Ephraim, Utah, by the name Peter C. Sorensen. I am sorry to part with Brother Christensen.

May 14 Tuesday, I left Ålborg and walked to Nibe and got there at 4 pm and in the evening I visited Sister Kulbe and Sister Sorensen.

May 15 Wednesday, I walked from Nibe to Lögstör and got home at 9 am, a distance of 17 miles. When we got home our rooms were papered and cleaned so nice.

May 16 Thursday, I was in the house all day and rested from my long walk the day before.

May 17 Friday, I went to Næsby and delivered the stars and visited six families. I made arrangements to hold a meeting next Sunday.

May 18 Saturday, I was in the house all day reading and writing.

May 19 Sunday, I went to Næsby and held a meeting and there were 16 present. The meeting was held in Stenhugger [stone mason] Jensens and I had a good time. The first outside meeting we held alone.

May 20 Monday, I went tracting and visited 12 families and had 5 gospel conversations.

May 21 Tuesday, I read the scriptures and studied the gospel and went down to the docks.

May 22 Wednesday, I wrote a letter to my dear ones.

May 23 Thursday, I went tracting and visited 14 strange houses and gave away 21 tracts and visited Busks in Ranum and some houses on the road.

May 24 Friday, I wrote some letters and visited some houses at Lögstör.

May 25 Saturday, I wrote some letters in the forenoon and in the afternoon I went fishing. I caught two torsk [cod fish] and at night I visited our værtinde [landlady].

May 26 Sunday, I sat in the house all day and read the paper, and at night the girls came to see us.

May 27, 1901 Monday, I stayed in the house and spent 2nd Whitsun day.

May 28, 1901 Tuesday, I visited several houses in Lögstör by invitation and had three gospel conversations and had a general good time.

May 29 Wednesday, I wrote a letter to my dear ones at home and visited two strange houses.

May 30 Thursday, I went to Næsby and visited two families and had a good time.

May 31 Friday, I changed companions and visited some farm houses, I did not like to change companions but the Lord’s will be done.

June 1, 1901 Saturday, I stayed at home all day except a little visit into Madam Knutsens. I visited the graveyard and gave away 6 tracts and had 4 gospel conversations.

June 2, 1901 I stayed in the house all day and read the news.

June 3 Monday, I went to Kölby and visited two families that had relatives up in Ephraim, Utah. They were very kind to us.

June 4 Tuesday, I came home from Kölby and visited 4 more houses that had friends in Utah. They treated us like we were Lords, nothing was too good for us. We ate four or five times a day.

June 5 Wednesday, We went from Lögstör to Ålborg and met Nephi Larsen of Preston. It was Grundlovs day, the same as our 4th of July and at night we went out to the Skovbakken [a hill-park in Ålborg with overlook of the city] to see the fireworks.

June 6 Thursday, Nephi and I went to Bælum to visit some of his relatives. At night we stayed at an inn in Bælum.

June 7 Friday, Nephi Larsen and I went to Siem, about 6 miles from where we stayed and there we found 8 families of his relatives and visited with them on June 8.

June 9 We went back to Terndrup and visited a second cousin of his by the name of Niels Thompsen and he hitched up on his buggy and took us to Gudumlund a distance of 9 miles. There is where Brother Larsen was born and from there we went to Gudumholm and got there too late for the train so had to walk to Ålborg.

Jun 10,11,12 I visited around in Ålborg and wrote some letters and on June 13 I walked to Nibe and stayed overnight with Jensens.

June 14 I walked to Kölby, 2 miles, and stayed overnight at Andres Polsens. They were fine folks.

June 15 I walked to Lögstör, a distance of 9 miles and got home at noon and was tired.

June 16 Sunday, one of our lonesome days. I was in Kundsens all day. We had a good dinner there. Danish supper.

June 17 I went to Næsby and delivered the stars and visited 2 other families and had a good chat with the people.

June 18 I went out tracting in Vindblæs. I visited 27 houses and gave away 48 tracts and had 2 conversations.

June 19 I wrote a letter to my wife and Lawrence and studied the scriptures.

June 20, 1901 I went to Ranum and delivered the stars to Niels Bunker and Smay Lars.

June 21, 1901 I and Brother N.P. Johnson visited Madam Knudsen and had a good gospel conversation and we also visited Thomas Polesens and had a good gospel chat with them. We were invited over to Buckers P. Christensen and Per Knudsens and we ate supper with our host [landlady] Knutsens and had a general good time.

June 22 I went to Nibe and delivered the stars to Thomas Larsen and Jens Jensen and had long talk on gospel with Thomas and at night I had a long talk on the gospel with Madam Knutsen. She said as soon as her husband would give his consent she would get baptized.

June 23 I attended a silver wedding at Smay Lars’ in Ranum and had a good time. The first silver wedding I ever attended.

June 24 Monday, I visited the harbor in Lögstör and saw them pull a ship up on shore to repair it and at night was invited into the poor house to see an old woman and she asked for baptism. I gave her two weeks to consider.

June 25 I visited the bookstore and purchased an album for 7 crowns and studied the scriptures the balance of the day.

June 26 Rained all day.

June 27 I visited Thomas Lund and six other families.

June 28 Brother Jens Jensen from Copenhagen paid us a visit and at night we accompanied him 2 miles on his way home and he came back and stayed overnight with us.

June 29 I was in the house all day chatting with Brother Jensen and at night we went to Ranum to visit Brother Busk.

June 30 Sunday, I sat in the house all day and read the news and the church works.

July 1 Monday, 1901 I sent in a report of Lögstör branch and straightened up the books and in the afternoon I visited a couple of houses and gave away 4 tracts and had 2 gospel conversations.

July 2 Tuesday, I went and took a bath in the Limfjorden.

July 3 I walked from Lögstör to Kölby and visited 3 families on the way and stayed over night at Petter Nargores.

July 4 I walked from Kölby to Nibe, a distance of 10 miles and stayed overnight at Jens Jensens.

July 5, 1901 I took the train from Nibe to Ålborg.

July 6 I was in Ålborg all day. I got a letter from home with my 2 little girls’ pictures in and at night attended priesthood meeting.

July 7 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 3 meetings in Ålborg, I spoke once. I ate supper at Sister and Brother Frestrops. I confirmed a boy.

July 8 I was Ålborg all day reading and at night Pres. Miller and I visited 2 families out in Vejgård that was on the back track, I also had a bath in Limfjorden.

July 9 I took the steamer from Ålborg to Lögstör.

July 10 I went to Næsby and Ranum with the stars and visited 6 families and had 3 gospel conversations. I did not get home until after midnight.

July 11 I went visiting strange houses in Tolstrup. I visited 32 and gave away 68 tracts and one Book and had 6 gospel conversations.

July 12 I visited around in Lögstör a little and at night I baptized a woman in the Limfjorden by the name of Mette Magratha Christensen.

July 13 I went from Lögstör to Ålborg by steamer and met Brother Fjeldsted and Brother Skanchy.

July 14 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings. I talked once and I went with Brother Miller and Brother Skanchy to Sister Pettersons to dinner and to Sister Micklesens to supper.

July 15 Monday, I was in Ålborg doing nothing, except I had a bath in Limjforden.

July 16 Tuesday, I was in Ålborg getting ready to go to Copenhagen. Brother Pettersen and I ate dinner at a restaurant and at 8 pm we went on board the steamer Cimbrie and sailed 240 miles and arrived in Copenhagen 8 am on the 17th.

July 17 Wednesday, We arrived in Copenhagen 8 am this morning and went to the Guteberg hotel and then we went to the office and visited the brethren and then we went to Absalonsgade to visit a lady Mortensen but did not find her home.

July 18 Thursday, I left Copenhagen and went to Frederiksborg or Hillerod, the place where my parents were born. There I met with Brother Rasmus Rasmusen, the old bishop of Mink Creek and in the afternoon I went to Frederiksværk and stayed over night at the Afolts Hjem [home].

July 19 Friday, I walked from Frederiksværk to Hundested and met 2 of father’s brother’s daughter’s. The men’s names are Lars Jergen Larsen, Lars wife’s name is Bodel Larsen. They had 8 children, Leaney Marey, Lars. Hans, Jenssenay Magrat, C. Caurens, Leaney Marey, Baby Harrel. Alfred Carl and cousin Anna Batrah her husband’s name is Jergen Niels Jensen. Their children’s names are Jens Christen, Lars Jergens and Hans Petter. Dead 2 years, St Lars night, born September 12, 1878. I also visited Niels Larsen, his wife was my second cousin. Her name was Karen. They also had 3 children. At night slept at cousin Anna Batrah’s.

July 20 Saturday, I visited my 2 cousins, Uncle Lars. J., Larses’ boys. They are fishers and tender-hearted. Jens lives in Hundested and Peter lives in Kikhavn.

July 21 Sunday, I held meeting at ten in a missions house. We had 60 to talk to after meeting. I ate dinner at cousin Jens’ and then I visited Aunt Karen, Uncle Niels Larsens’ widow and then I visited Jens Jern and some folks, father’s second cousin. He had a nice family and we had a fine dinner and then by request we went to Kikhavn and held a meeting at cousin Peter’s place. There we had 60 present and we visited after meeting a second cousin and slept at cousin Peter’s place.

July 22 Monday, I bid farewell to my friends and started for Frederiksværk and cousin Peter accompanied us on the way for a mile. He cried like a baby when we parted. I was treated fine, was well received by all. I got there 5 minutes too late for the train. I took the 1 train and arrived in Copenhagen at 4 and then I went and found Mary and Ellen [mother’s sister] and 2 of my cousins Ellen and Mary. They treated me fine. Then I went from their place and found my boss’ father’s brother’s daughter, Hans Ottesen.

July 23 Tuesday, the first thing we did was to go to hotel Svea and there I met James P. Christensen and A. Johnson, A D. Mortensen. Then we visited the kings old palace that had been burned and saw the kings wagons and from there we went to the art gallery and then to the Zoologic Gardens and saw all kinds of wild animals. Then I went from there to my aunt’s and cousin’s place. Cousin’s man’s name is A. Blickfelt and then I went from there to Charlottenlund to visit my cousin Lars (he is clerk in a big hardware store), but did not find him home. Then I went back to Copenhagen.

July 24 I went over to Sweden and ate dinner at a Swedish hotel at Malmö then we visited the Elders that labor there. Then we visited King Oscar’s gardens and several of the places of note in town. This is a city of 64,000 people. At 3 we bid the Elders goodbye and took the boat back. Then we visited my 2 cousins, Ellen and Mary and ate supper with them. We preached the gospel to them for 2 hours and they were willing to listen.

July 25 I visited my cousin L. Nielsen, my aunt’s son. He lives at Charlottenlund, and at night I visited two of my second cousins. They were cousin Peter’s girls. They treated me fine. They were glad to see me and gave me good meal.

July 26 I went to Tåstrup St. and visited a family that Brother Petersen had the address to. They also treated us fine and when we got back, we went and ate supper with cousin Kirstine. We had a good chat.

July 27 Saturday, In connection with cousin Lars went to Frederiksværk to see about the arve [inheritance], but could do nothing without a fuldmagt [warrant or letter of attorney] from home. At night we visited cousin Kirstine and my cousin Cena came to see me and we ate supper with cousin Mary.

July 28 I went from Copenhagen to Tåstrup and visited a family by the name of Niels Jensen and in the afternoon we left for Köge and visited a cousin of Brother Peterson and slept at a kro [an inn] among the fleas.

July 29 Monday, I walked from Köge to Vordingborg and there took the train to Kalvehave and then steamer to Stege on Mön [an island]. Vordingborg was the capital of Denmark a long time ago. King Valdemar lived there. The old ruins of the fortifications and dueling stands there yet. The south end of Denmark is beautiful to look at. Trees dotted all over and grain is heavy.

July 30 I walked from Stege on the island of Mön to Hårbölle and visited 2 of Brother Petersons families and had a good time.

July 31 I wrote a letter to President Miller and sent in my report and also wrote a letter to my loved ones at home, bless them. I also took a walk over to Heming Hemingsen’s farm. He is Brother Petersens cousin and in the afternoon I visited another cousin of his by the name of Christen Hemingsen. We also visited an uncle of his, Christen Christensen and they treated us fine.

Aug 1 We went and visited the priest at Hårbölle. He also treated us fine and in the afternoon we went over to Falster. We got a fisher to take us over. We had a pleasant sail of 5 miles.

Aug 2 We got up at 3 in the morning and Heming Hemingsen drove us to Koster, a distance of 9 miles, where we took the boat for Kalvehave. There we took the train for Copenhagen and then steamer to Ålborg. H. Hemingsen is a fine man. Did all he could to make it interesting for us.

Aug 3, 1901 I came home from Copenhagen and was seasick. The water went over the deck all night but we made the trip all right. I am glad to be in Ålborg again.

Aug 4 Sunday, Fast Day. I attended Sunday School and three meetings. Ate Supper with Sister Petersen.

Aug 5 Monday, nothing of any consequence. I had a bath in the Limfjorden.

Aug 6 I was in Ålborg loafing and waiting for conference.

Aug 7 I visited the Natnol [National?] Hotel to get a hall to hold meetings in.

Aug 8 Thursday, I attended Conference in Ålborg in the forenoon in the hall and the authorities were sustained and Brother Miller was released and James Johnson
of Preston was sustained as President of the Ålborg conference (and N. P. Johnson of Logan and N. Nielsen of Logan were appointed to labor with me). In the afternoon or at night we held meetings in the National Hotel and Apostle Lyman spoke to us and N.P. Johnson of Logan was interpreter.

Aug 9 Friday, was priesthood meeting. James C. Nielsen of Rockland was excommunicated for fornication.

Aug 10 Saturday, I visited around Ålborg through the day and had a bath in Limfjorden and at night we baptized a man by the name of Overgaad. I prayed at the water’s edge and Nephi Nilsen did the baptizing and Richard Miller the confirming.

Aug 11 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and at night I was introduced to the people and spoke few minutes. Brother Miller gave his farewell sermon and after meeting I went to Festrupet and had cocoa and cake.

Aug 12 Monday, I went to Nörresundby and ate dinner with Sister Larsen and at night I bid Miller good-bye at 8:23, then we went back to the hall and held meeting.

Aug 13 Thursday, I left Ålborg for Lögstör to get my trunk and bid goodbye to the many good friends I had there.

Aug 14 Wednesday, I walked to Næsby and called on Thomas Larsen and Jens Jensen and Jacob Gartesle and bid them farewell and left my testimony with them and then went to Ranum and bid the folks there goodby and at night sister Olena Jensen and Sister Busk called on us and bid me God speed and good bye.

Aug 15 I moved from Lögstör to Ålborg.

Aug 16 In connection with Elders Johnson and Nephi Neilsen visited a Neils Kathrena Hansen in Helgolandsgade No 18 Tofstore. I also visited Frederikshavn and Skagen in connection with Brother Christensen. We went on two of the Signal stations and had a good chat about home and friends.

Aug 17, 1901 Saturday, I went bathing in the Limfjorden and at night I and Nielsen and Johnson went and ate supper with Lars C. Anderson and spent the evening with them.

Aug 18 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and held 2 meetings and visited a family of saints and had chocolate with them. When I got back, Elder Nephi Nielsen and I went and administered to a Sister Nicklena Neilsen. She was very sick when we came in but was instantly healed and got up and came to meeting.

Aug 19 I received some books and tracts from Copenhagen and unpacked them and then I wrote a letter to my wife and at night I and Johnson and Nielsen visited Brother Markensen at Scrtevelisgade [Steen Billes Gade?]. He had scalded his foot quite badly. He was glad to see us and when we got home again, Widow Jensen and her girls were there and they spent the evening with us.

Aug 20 Tuesday, I went in bathing and in the afternoon I visited a family by the name of Olsen who is investigating and ate supper with them and at night I attended a Relief Society meeting and after meeting, Elder Nielsen and I accompanied Sister Nicklena Nielsen home as she was afraid to go alone.

Aug 21 Wednesday, I was a little under the weather. I went and administered to Sister Festrop and visited Anders Petersen and Sister Knutsen and Sister and Brother Gadesen in Skomager gade no. 7 and at night I attended young meeting.

Aug 22 Thursday, I visited around Ålborg and wrote some letters.

Aug 23 Friday, I did the same as yesterday.

Aug 24 Saturday, I went to the docks and met Brother and Sister Westergaard from Thisted who were going to emigrate. At night we went and baptized a young woman by the name of Maren Katheren Hansen. Nephi Nielsen did the baptizing and I did confirming and after that was all done, we had chocolate and cake.

Aug 25 Sunday, I attended Sunday School in the morning and at 2 pm I went to Arden, the place where I first labored and had a good time.

Aug 26 Monday, I in company with Brother Jacobsen visited 2 families of investigators and had a splendid time with them and at night returned to Ålborg. Sister Jensen’s girls met me at the station.

Aug 27 Tuesday, I visited Sister Petersen and ate dinner with her and in the afternoon I visited Brother and Sister Klitgaard and at night I attended Relief Society meeting and had to preach.

Aug 28 Wednesday, I ate dinner again with Sister Petersen and in the afternoon I and Nielson and Johnson went to Vejgaard and visited Dausels family and ate supper with them and at night attended young men’s meeting.

Aug 29 Thursday, I wrote a letter to Lorenzo Johnson and ate dinner with Sister Nielsen in Söndergade and at night I visited Sister Madisen and Sister Johansen and Christensen in Helgolandsgade and ate supper with them and administered to Sister Christensen.

Ålborg Friday, Aug 30, 1901 I visited Sister Larsen and ate dinner with her and after dinner I visited an older couple in Stengade that had been in Utah and wanted to go again. I   had a good conversation with them and when I got back to the hall, Elder C.C. Larsen was there and Elder Bindrupp from Norge [Norway]. He had been selected from Norway to labor in Ålborg and Larson had been over there on a visit.

Ålborg Saturday, Aug 31, 1901 I received a letter from home and I and Brother Nielsen visited a family in Norewrep [?] by the name of Larson and we had a nice gospel conversation with 2 ladies and at night I held priesthood meeting.

Ålborg Sunday, Sept 1, 1901 I attended Sunday School and held 3 meetings. I ate dinner at Walter Peterson’s. There are 10 Elders in Ålborg.

Ålborg Monday, Sept 2, 1901 I made up the monthly reports and sent them to Copenhagen and at night we went and ate supper with Sister Jensen and daughters in Möllgade and at 10:30 pm we baptized a woman by the name Larssana Nielsen.

Ålborg Tuesday, Sept 3, 1901 I finished the monthly report and then wrote to James Christensen and at night I attended Relief Society meeting and talked to them. We had a good time.

Ålborg Wednesday, Sept 4 I wrote a letter to my dear ones at home and had a good gospel conversation. At night I attended young Men’s meeting and after meeting I baptized a 17 young woman by the name of Laura Marie Larsen in the Limfjorden by the railroad bridge and Nephi N. Nielsen did the confirming.

Ålborg Thursday, September 5 I received a letter from home and one from Joseph Johnson and also the power of attorney for the money that we get from and in the afternoon I and Nephi visited the deaf man Christensen and family and we and Brother Johnson visited a Sister Nielsen in Oster Sundby and at night I attended singing practice.

Ålborg Friday, Sept 6 I received monthly statement from President Skanchy and looked over the book and found a mistake of Kr18.00 and I wrote a letter asking corrections. I also sold a Book of Mormon and ready reference to a Josephite preacher and had a gospel conversation with him. He was glad to get away from us. I just heard that McKinley was shot.

Ålborg Sunday, Sept 7 I wrote a letter to Copenhagen to Lars Nielsen, my cousin, gave him authority to settle for then and sent him 8 photos and at night we baptized Brother Dausel’s little girl. I ate supper with Brother Andersens and accompanied Sister Nickleney Nielsen to the steamer. She went to Copenhagen for a visit.

Brönderslev Sunday, Sep 8 I was in Brönderslev attending grovss made [?]. I attended S. School and 2 meetings and spoke in all of them. Ate supper with Maren S. Christensen.

Ålborg Sept 9 I returned home from Brönderslev. At night we had a call of most of the saints. They came to bid goodby to Sister Jensen who was going to emigrate but was disappointed because her name wasn’t sent in.

Ålborg Sept 10 I went and drank chocolate with Sister Larsen and Brother Peterson. Got awful sick and at night Brother N.M. Nielsen and C.P. Christensen and I went to a circus in Denmark’s gade. It was a fine circus.

Ålborg Sept 11 I visited a girl that served in the building that we live in and at night I attended young men’s meeting.

Ålborg Sept 12 Brother Nielsen and I went over to Nörresundby to Sister Larsen’s and ate dinner. We ate chicken soup and sang a few songs. On our way home we went over Skanse [a fort].

Ålborg Sep 13 I wrote a letter to my dear wife and one to son James and at night I and Elders Nielsen and Johnson visited a young Sister Hansen and ate supper with her and spent the evening in singing and talking and when we got home Sister Jensen called us in to administer to her. She was possessed and was very sick but the Lord heard and answered our prayers. She was healed almost instantly.

Ålborg Sep 14 I visited around among the Saints and went and had a bath, the first one this fall. Ate supper at Brother and Sister Andersen’s and at night we baptized 2 of Brother Markensen’s children and I confirmed Neils Christensen.

Ålborg Sep 15 I took the early train and went to Frederikshavn to visit that branch. I attended school and 2 meetings. Ate dinner with Brother and Sister Petersen and had a good time.

Ålborg Sept 16, Monday I returned from Frederikshavn and called at Brönderslev and at night I and Elder Johnson and Nielsen went to Möllegade and drank chocolate and ate cake and sang songs and talked gospel to them.

Ålborg Tuesday, Sept 17 I got a letter from my loved ones at home and went out tracting in the afternoon and visited 60 houses and had 2 conversations.

Ålborg Sept 18 I and Johnson, Nielsen and Madsen argued some foolish mess. In the afternoon Elder Johnson Jensen.

Ålborg Sept 19 I visited Olsens, Elder Christensen’s uncle, we ate dinner with them then I visited 18 strangers houses and gave away 18 tracts.

Ålborg Sept 20, 1901 In the forenoon I wrote a letter to grandma and in the afternoon I and Elder Nielsen visited Brother Dausles and ate with him and we also visited Brother and Sister Larsens at Vejgård and got back to the office at 9:50 and then we went and baptized a Christen Petersen of Ålborg. I did the baptizing and Elder Johnson the confirming.

Ålborg Sept 21 I went out to Vejgård and visited Bro. Dausles and Larsen and wrote a letter to my wife and spent the evening at Petersen’s.

Ålborg Sept 22 I attended Sunday School and held 2 meetings. Elder Jacobson gave us his farewell sermon and Brother Christensen from Copenhagen Conference paid us a visit.

Sept 23, 1901 We had visitors. I went in the morning and changed Sister Nielsen and Jensen’s money and packed Sister Jensen’s trunk and we all accompanied them to the depot. All the Elders were in except 4 of them.

Sep 24 I and Elder Christensen visited around Ålborg taking in the town.

Ålborg Sept 25 I and Elder Johnson visited Sister Knutsen and exhorted her to try to live a virtuous life and be faithful to the covenant she had made with God and then we went to Sister Godesen and chatted with her and drank chocolate and ate cake with her.

Sep 26 I and Elder Nielsen and Christensen visited Nr Tranders and came back from there and visited photograph Madsen and at night I accompanied Elder Christensen to the harbor as he went to Copenhagen. Brother Christensen is from Levan, Utah.

Sept 27 I was out a little at night. I visited Sister Thomsen and Christensen and had a good time and there was some strangers there.

Ålborg September 28 I wrote 2 letters and went to Andersen to supper.

Sept 29 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings. A Brother C. N. Christensen from Århus Conference.

Sept 30 I and Neilsen, Petersen and Christen Christensen. Christensen went bathing and at night we started English School.

Oct 1, 1901 I received 10 letters and read them. Then I went to the docks to see the steamer come in, it was so foggy we could not see 30 yards. At night we baptized a woman, Anna Christensen. I confirmed her.

Ålborg Oct 2, 1901 I studied the bible and read and wrote a lot and in the afternoon I and Elder Nielsen visited Brother Markensens and at night we visited Sister Jensen. It was her oldest daughter’s birthday. She was 19 years old and we had young men’s meeting also and Sister Jensen was sick again and we called on her.

Ålborg Oct 3 I visited Sister Jensen’s. She was better. I went and administered to her 3 o’clock this morning. We ate dinner with Sister Peterson and at night we had singing practice.

Oct 4 I went to the docks and met Elder Johnson and then I worked at the books all day. At night I visited Sister Hanson and ate supper with her.

Oct 5 I worked at the books and wrote a letter to my dear ones. At night we held priesthood meeting.

Oct 6 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 3 meetings, it being Fast day.

Ålborg Oct 7 Monday, I worked at the books all day.

Oct 8 Thursday, I worked at the books and at night I held a Relief Society meeting and reorganized it. Sister Garlick was sustained as president with Sister Frestrap and Pettersen as counselors.

Ålborg Oct 9 I visited Chransens and had a chat with them and wrote a letter to Madsen and visited the saints in Möllegade and in Söndergade and attended YMMIA at night.

Ålborg Oct 10 I visited 3 families in Vejgård and at night I attended sing practice.

Oct 11 I visited around among the Saints.

Oct 12 I wrote a letter to my dear ones at home.

Ålborg Oct 13 I went to Brönderslev and attended 1 Sunday School and 8 meetings and came back to Ålborg at 1 am Monday.

Ålborg Oct 14 I returned from Brönderslev and got ready to go to Thisted.

Ålborg Oct 15 I and Elder Johnson walked from Ålborg to Nibe in a rain storm and at night we met all the saints and had a good time together.

Nibe Oct 16 I visited around in Nibe.

Nibe Oct 17 I and Elder Johnson walked from Nibe to Lögstör and got there at 7 pm. We stopped in on the way and ate dinner with Niels Gregersen.

Lögstör Oct 18 We went to Næsby and Ranum and at night we intended to hold meeting in Lögstör but failed.

Lögstör 19 We took a steamer from Lögstör to Thisted and met the Thisted brethren and we ate supper at Sister Hansen’s.

Thisted Oct 20, 1901 Sunday, I attended 2 meetings and spoke in both of them. The brethren hold a meeting every Sunday night. The prospects looked good for the future.

Thisted Oct 21 Monday, I and Elder Johnson took a train from Thisted to Holstebro and then walked 2 miles to Elkær. There we stopped for the night.

Elkær Oct 22 We walked from Elkær to Landting Mark where we visited 4 families. Stayed with Peter Stinsen.

Landting Mark Oct 23 We walked to Vinderup where I wrote a letter to my wife and son James and then took train to Skive and then walked 1 mile to where we stayed at Salling.

Salling Oct 24 I and Elder Johnson walked from Salling to Höjslev and slept at Hallin.

Hallin Oct 25 We visited 2 families in Böstrup and slept at one family and were well treated.

Böstrup Oct 26 We walked back to Hallin and visited 4 families and slept at the at the Mygore.

Oct 27 Sunday, We took the train to Ålborg and got there at 9 pm and found all alright.

Ålborg Oct 28 I was sick. I got a letter from my dear wife and wrote her one.

Ålborg Oct 29 I visited a few families in Ålborg. I also visited Nicklene Nielsen, she was sick and also ate dinner with them.

Ålborg Oct 30 I and Elder Johnson visited Sister Nielsen and then six other good people and attended meeting at night.

Ålborg Oct 31 Stayed in the house all day.

Ålborg Nov 1, 1901 This is one year in Ålborg.

Ålborg Nov 2 Saturday, I visited around Ålborg and did a little writing.

Nov 3 Sunday, Fast day, I attended Sunday School and 3 meetings and at night I and Elder Johnson and Sorensen went out to Vejgård and blessed one of Brother Larsen’s children, Niels B. Johnson being mouth.

Ålborg Nov 4 Monday, I stayed in the office.

Nov 5 I wrote a letter and accompanied Brother Sorensen to the steamer and at night I attended Relief Society meeting.

Nov 6 I read the papers.

Nov 7 I read all day and attended singing practice at night.

Nov 8 I wrote to Elder Johnson and Elder Binderup and Pres. Skanchy.

Ålborg Nov 9, 1901 I and Elder Larson visited the new harbor and I sent 9.45 Kr to Copenhagen for Buskes emigration.

Ålborg Nov 10 Sunday, I met Pres. Peterson at our houseconference and attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and Elder Petersen spoke in all of them.

Ålborg Nov 11 Monday, I and Pres. Peterson visited Ålborg and the new harbor and Nörresundby and had dinner at the eating house and at night Brother Petersen went home.

Nov 12 Not feeling well.

Nov 13 Visited some of the saints and at night I attended Y.M.M.I.A. meeting.

Nov 14 Stormed so I could not get outdoors. This was a severe storm. I read all day.

Nov 15 I read a little and visited some, and Brother Nielsen came home from Copenhagen.

Ålborg Nov 16 I wrote a letter and some in the book.

Ålborg Nov 17 I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings.

Ålborg Nov 18 Monday, I packed Sister Micklesen’s trunk. Sisters Micklesen and Nielsen and the Busk family left for Utah and also Elder Johnson of Logan.

Ålborg Nov 19 I wrote a letter to my dear wife and children and I went out tracting. I distributed 50 tracts and visited 4 houses and at night I attended Relief Society meeting and spent a pretty fair day all through.

Ålborg Nov 20 My second birthday in Denmark. I visited Sister Larson in connection with Elder Christensen and also his Uncle Olsen and wife Petersen. At night I attended Young Mens Meeting.

Ålborg Nov 21 I and Nephi Nielsen and C.N. Christensen walked to Brönderslev to see the Brethren there, a distance of 15 miles.

Ålborg Nov 22 I visited Estrup and tracted the town and invited them to meeting on Nov 23.

Ålborg Nov 23 I visited Oster Sundby and tracted the town and at night we held meeting there and had a good time. We had 20 odd for meeting.

Ålborg Nov 24 Sunday, attended Sunday School and 2 meetings. Had a few gospel conversations.

Ålborg Nov 25 Monday, I visited some of the saints and I visited Frestrups at night.

Ålborg Nov 26 I visited the Söndergade people and at night I attended Relief Society meeting.

Ålborg Nov 27 Sick in bed.

Ålborg Nov 28 Sick in bed, but a little better.

Ålborg Nov 29 Sick, but not in bed.

Ålborg Nov 30 I was making out reports all day and at night I held Priesthood meeting.

Ålborg Dec 1, 1901 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 3 meetings and had several gospel conversations.

Ålborg Dec 2 I got the reports all ok and did some writing.

Ålborg Dec 3 I wrote a letter to James Christensen and did some straightening up in the books and the Elders came in from Bröndreslev and the brothers from Arden went out.

Ålborg Dec 4, 1901 I and Elder Christensen visited Petersen in Vingorstred and Olsens, his uncle.

Dec 5 I wrote all day.

Dec 6 I visited around town.

Dec 7 I wrote 3 letters and visited 3 families that were disgruntled and had a good time. Sister Thomsen promised to do better in the future.

Ålborg Dec 8 Sunday, I visited Brönderslev Branch and attended Sunday School and 2 meetings.

Dec 9 I returned home from Brönderslev.

Ålborg Dec 10 I went to Brönderslev in company with Elders Fjelsted, Christensen and Nielsen to attend a birthday party of C. N. Christensen and returned again on the midnight train.

Ålborg Dec 11 I was under the weather and I wrote a letter to my wife and to brother Ren and at night I attended YMMIA.

Ålborg Dec 12 Thursday, I wrote some during the day and at night Elder Nielsen Steinhouse and C.N. Christensen went to the railroad bridge and baptized a woman whose name was Christensen.

Ålborg Dec 13 I visited around town a little and at night I went to Dausels and held a meeting and we had a good time. We had a good crowd.

Ålborg Dec 14 I went to Fredrickshaven.

Dec 15 I went to Frederikshavn to attend Branch meeting. I attended priesthood meeting Saturday evening and Sunday School and 2 meetings on Sunday and returned to Ålborg on the 10 train. Got to Ålborg 1am.

Dec 16 I went tracting and visited 34 groups and attended English school.

Ålborg Dec 17 I went tracting. I visited 38 houses and gave away 65 tracts and 2 books and at night I attended Relief Society meeting and after meeting I had a good chat with some of the disgruntled saints.

Dec 18 I wrote letters to president Skanchy and to my wife and children and at night I visited Sister Knutsen.

Ålborg Dec 19 I visited Petersen in Christensgade and had a chat with them.

Ålborg Dec 20 I visited Christensgade again and Sister Petersen wished to reattain her standing.

Ålborg Dec 21, 1901 Saturday, I rested all day and at night I went and visited Sister Larsen and administered to her.

Ålborg Dec 22 I went to Ulsted and helped Steinhouse hold a meeting and came back to Ålborg at night again.

Ålborg Dec 23, 1901 I wrote a letter and worked at the Christmas tree.

Ålborg Dec 24, 1901 I worked at the tree all day and at night I went to Sister Jensen’s to supper.

Ålborg Dec 25, 1901 Christmas, I worked at the tree and at 4 pm we started our doings and after the doings I and E. Christen Petersen visited Frestrups and at 12 in the night, I and Christensen and Petersen went and administered to Sister Maria Jensen.

Ålborg Dec 26, 1901 I held meeting to commemorate Christ’s birth and had a full house.

Ålborg Dec 27, 1901 I went to Brönderslev and saw a Christmas tree I ate supper at N. Andersen’s.

Dec 28 I visited Sister Larsen’s at Nörresundby and ate dinner and at night I and C.N. Christensen and Axel F. Andreasen visited C.N.C. of the same place.

Ålborg Dec 29 I wrote all day.

Ålborg Dec 30 I and Elders C.N. Christensen and Nephi M. Neilsen went to Tolstrup and held a meeting. We hired a hall and gave a krown and 1/2 krown for advertisement. We had a good crowd—120 persons and then went back to Lögstör.

Lögstör Dec 31 We got left, the steamer was too fast for us. We had to take the train home and did not get there til 10. Then I went to Olsens to supper.

Ålborg Jan 1, 1902 I attended a chocolate party at night.

Ålborg Jan 2, 1902 I visited Petersen in Vengardstede and ate dinner with them and at night we baptized 2. They were C.N. Christensen’s cousins. Nice folks.

Ålborg Jan 3 I did some work on the books.

Ålborg Jan 4, 1902 I visited a few saints and worked at the books a little.

Ålborg 5 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and went over to Nörresundby and ate dinner with C.N. Christensen.

Ålborg Jan 6 I worked at the books all day.

Ålborg Jan 7 and 8 and 9 I and C.P. Christensen made out a financial report for the year 1901.

Ålborg Jan 10 I visited around town a little and read a letter.

Ålborg Jan 11, 1902 I did nothing to speak of, I did a little writing.

Ålborg Jan 12 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and we had a full house and had a good time all day.

Ålborg Jan 13, 1902 Monday, I visited around town a little and some of the saints.

Ålborg Jan 14 Thursday, I visited Petersen in Christensgade, he is on the back track.

Ålborg Jan 15, 1902 I did nothing but read.

Ålborg Jan 16, 1902 I went tracting and visited 51 houses and gave away 75 tracts and 2 books and had 1 gospel conversation.

Ålborg Jan 17, 1902 I worked at the reports all day as I had to make a new one.

Ålborg Jan 18 I went to Svenstrup.

Ålborg Jan 19, 1902 I visited Arden Branch and held a meeting.

Ålborg Jan 20 Monday, I wrote letters all day to President Skanchy.

Jan 21, 1902 Thursday, I also wrote to C.C. Larsen and to grandma and grandpa.

Jan 22, 1902 Wednesday, I started to write and was disturbed by the Miliagade girls and at night I attended Young Mens meeting.

Ålborg Jan 23, 1902 I fixed up the furniture in the hall and at night I visited Morten Jensen and had a good time with them.

Ålborg January 24 I and Christensen and Neilsen spent the day wiring our chairs and at night we went and spent the evening.

Ålborg Jan 25 Saturday, I spent the day reading the news and at night I visited Christensen Christensen in Nörresundby and spent a pleasant evening.

Ålborg Jan 26 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and held 2 meetings and attended a Baptist meeting in the drametogen.

Ålborg Jan 27 Monday, I and Christensen wrote a piece for the paper in answer to one some good Christian had put in about us.

Ålborg Jan 28 I and Elder Nielsen visited a Petersen family and administered to their little baby. At night I attended Relief Society Meeting.

Ålborg Jan 29, 1902 I wrote 2 letters and at night I attended YMMIA.

Ålborg Jan 30 Thursday, I studied the Bible.

Jan 31 I tracted Vejgård and at night we held a meeting.

Ålborg February 1, 1902 I wrote out the report.

Ålborg Feb 2 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 3 meetings.

Ålborg Feb 3, 1902 I did some writing and reading and at night Elder Nielsen went to the theatre.

Ålborg Feb 4 I and Elder Nielsen went to Nibe and held a meeting at night.

Ålborg 5 I went from Nibe to Års to hold a meeting but no one came and then we went to Lögstör.

Lögstör Feb 6 I visited around Lögstör.

Lögstör F. 7 I did some visiting.

Ålborg 8 I came home from Lögstör.

Ålborg Feb 9, 1902 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and visited a strange family and ate dinner with them.

Ålborg Feb 10, 1902 Monday, I visited Brother Markensens and Johanna Larsen and at night I attended English School and read the Bible some.

Ålborg Feb 11 Tuesday, I visited some of the saints and did some reading and worked some at the books.

Ålborg Feb 12 Wednesday, I wrote a letter to my dear ones and attended YMMIA at night and I spoke in it.

Ålborg Feb 13 Thursday, I wrote some letters and at night I visited Sister Thompson, and had a chat with a girl that worked in the factory.

Ålborg Feb 14 Friday, I went out tracting. I visited 46 houses and gave away 71 tracts and at night I visited Dausals and ate supper with them. We spent a pleasant evening together.

Ålborg Feb 15, 1902 Saturday, I wrote a letter to Soren Petersen and did a little bookkeeping.

Ålborg Feb 16, 1902 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and visited Sister Christensen and Sister Hansen and had a good chat with her cousin and sister, those are not in the Church.

Ålborg Feb 17 Monday, I went out tracting I visited 25 strange houses and gave away 40 tracts.

Ålborg Feb 18 Thursday, I visited around Ålborg all day among the saints, it being E. Nephi Nielsen’s birthday so we had a good time.

Ålborg Feb 19 Wednesday, I wrote a little and visited some of the saints and at night I attended YMMIA.

Ålborg Feb 20 Thursday, I wrote a letter to my dear ones and attended singing practice and did some visiting.

Ålborg Feb 21 Friday, I visited a family in Nörresundby and conversed with them for 3 hours on the gospel and at night I visited Christen Larsen in Vedordes.

Ålborg Feb 22, 1902 Saturday I wrote to Thomas Greaves and at night I visited in connection with Elder N. M. Nielsen, Morten Jensen some investigators. We spent a fine evening.

Ålborg Feb 23 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and at night I ate supper with Kirstine Hansen. This is my dear wife’s fourtieth birthday. I would like to be with her.

Ålborg Feb 24 Monday, I had a bad toothache and had a tooth pulled.

Ålborg Feb 25 Tuesday, I was sick in bed.

Ålborg Feb 26 Wednesday, I was sick in bed.

Ålborg Feb 27 Thursday, I visited Sister Jensen and went with Brother Petersen out to the cement factory and visited some of his folks.

Ålborg Feb 28 Friday, I visited Söndergade.

Ålborg March 1 Saturday, I visited around town a little and at night I held Priesthood meeting and we cut 4 persons off the church: a Jensen in Hobro, a Jensene Christensen in Nibe, a Sister Nielsen in Ålborg, a Sister Jensen in Ålborg.

Ålborg March 2 Sunday, I attended 3 meetings and a Sunday School.

Ålborg March 3 Monday, I visited around Ålborg a little and worked at the books a little.

Ålborg March 4 Tuesday, I visited a Sister Christensen and administered to her and at night I attended Relief Society meeting.

Ålborg March 5 Wednesday, I wrote a letter to my dear ones at home and in the afternoon I in connection with Brother C. N. C. visited his uncle and at night I attended YMIA.

Ålborg March 6 I visited 3 families in Vigegårde and Brother Anderson and at night I visited Morten Jensen and had a good talk with them.

Ålborg March 7, 1902 I did some visiting and at night Elders C.N. and N.N. and I visited Christensens.

Ålborg March 8 Worked at the books.

Ålborg March 9 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings.

Ålborg March 10 Monday, I worked at the book all day at night I attended singing practice.

Ålborg March 11 I wrote letters all day.

March 12 I and Elder Nielsen attended a wedding in Söndergade and at night we attended YMMIA.

Ålborg March 13 I visited Sister Larsen in Nörresundby and ate dinner with them and had a good time. Her husband asked for baptism.

Ålborg March 14 I left Ålborg for Frederikshavn at 1 pm stopped at Kvissel and held a meeting and arrived at Fredrikshaven at 11.

March 15 I spent the day in Frederikshavn. I visited Sister Garturde Petersen and administered to her and sat up with her.

Frederikshavn March 16 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings. Sister Garturde Petersen died. She was a good woman. She did not want to die.

Frederikshavn March 17 I visited around town a little and at night I went to Sæby and held a meeting and got a cursing.

Frederikshavn March 18 I was not well. I was in the house all day and read all day.

Frederikshavn March 19 I did nothing.

“ “ 20 “ “ “

“ “ 21 I attended the funeral and then came to Ålborg again.

Ålborg M 22 I received a letter from my wife that had been lost for 2 weeks and read the news. At night Elder C.N. Christensen visited a Jensen family that is investigating.

Ålborg March 23 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings it being the last Sunday Elder C.N. Christensen would be here, he spoke most of the time. We had good meetings.

Ålborg March 24th, 1902 Monday, I and Elder C.N. Christensen visited 6 families.

Ålborg March 25th, 1902 Thursday, I wrote to my dear ones at home and attended to the money changing for the emigrants and straightened things up.

Ålborg March 26th Wednesday, I went tracting a part of the day in Nörresundby visited 43 houses and gave away 73 tracts and had 1 conversation. At night I attended YMMIA.

Ålborg March 27 Thursday. I in connection with Elders Neilsen and Christensen left Ålborg to go to Tolstrup and held a meeting. There were 32 strangers present and after meeting we went to Lögstör and stayed overnight. Nielsen and I stayed at the Temperance Hotel.

Ålborg March 28 I in company with Elders Nielsen and Christensen walked from Lögstör to Bonderup and then took a train from there to Ålborg and arrived there at 8 pm.

Ålborg March 29 Saturday, I wrote all day.

Ålborg March 30 Sunday, I attended 2 Sunday Schools and 2 meetings and at night I went to Sister Christensen’s to supper.

Ålborg Monday, March 31 I visited around town a little and I did some visiting.

Ålborg April 1 I worked at the books.

April 2 I went to Gjörup to attend a meeting which had been appointed. The priest and school teacher had been invited but did not come, but we had a good meeting. There were 40 strangers present and they were well pleased.

Ålborg April 3 I just came home from Gjörup. I had a man ask me to ride with him. I had a good chat with him. I arrived home at 4 P.M. and went to Söndergarde.

Ålborg April 4 I made out the report and sent it off and went to Logegade to dinner and had a good time.

Ålborg April 5 Saturday, I worked all forenoon to get ready for Conference as it started that night at 8 P.M. At one o’clock I went to the station and met Pres. Skanchy, Pres. Christensen of Copenhagen and Pres. Petersen of Aarhus conference. The hour for meeting and a full-house with it and we had a feast listening to the Elders give us their reports of their labors.

Ålborg April 6 Sunday, 72 years since the Church was organized. We continued our conference. First meeting held in the hall that was 10 am and at 2 pm we held meeting in National Hotel and again at 7 pm and had a full house all the time. We listened to some good instructions from the 3 Presidents.

Ålborg April 7 We held priesthood meeting all day and listened to good instructions from President Skanchy. At night we held Sunday School conference and there we listened to some good instructions from President Christensen.

Ålborg April 8 I visited around Ålborg with Presidents Skanchy, Christensen and Petersen. We went up on Skovbakken and at night we held Relief Society Conference and we had a good time.

Ålborg April 9 I got up early and went to the station to see Pres. Skanchy off and then I went home and had a good rest from the worry of Conference and went to the station with some of the missionaries that left for the several fields of labor. It is just 18 months today since I kissed my wife and little ones good-by and left for my mission.

Ålborg April 10 I took stock of all the books and tracts and turned it over to C.P. Christensen, he being put in forstander [President] of that Branch and at night we baptized a young girl by the name of Meiteia Olsen, N. M. Neilsen performing the baptism and the confirming.

Ålborg April 11 Friday, I wrote letters all day to my wife and children and 1 to Lorenzo Johnson.

Ålborg April 12 I went to Sister Frestrupes and spent the evening.

Ålborg April 13 Sunday, I went to Brönderslev to attend Branch meeting. I arrived there at 10 am and attended Sunday School. We reorganized the School. I attended 2 meetings and had a fine time. I conversed until I was hoarse.

Bronderslev April 14 Monday, I returned to Ålborg again and found all well and in good condition.

Ålborg April 15 I visited 6 families in Ålborg and had a good time.

April 16 I wrote a letter to my dear ones at home and visited a few of the saints and at night I attended Y.M.M.I.A. and spoke.

Ålborg April 17 I visited a few friends and saints and at night I visited a Free baptist preacher and had a good time. I think he came to the conclusion he did not have much.

Ålborg April 18 I did some writing to Pres. Skanchy and some visiting in town.

Ålborg April 19 I left Ålborg and went to Frederikshavn to attend Branch meeting. I left Ålborg at 1 pm and arrived in Frederikshavn at 3 pm and met the Brethren there.

Frederikshavn April 20 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and reorganized the Sunday School and at 2 pm I attended Branch meeting and cut Sister Petersen off the Church for apostasy and at night I attended meeting again and talked again to a nice congregation. I got sick while talking so I had to stop.

Frederikshavn April 21 Monday, I in connection with Elder Andreason went and saw the Wild Beast Show and at night we visited an inter mission [a division of the Lutheran Church] – one family and had a long chat with them and ate supper with them.

Frederikshavn April 22 Tuesday, I visited a family and ate dinner with them, Fredrick Sorensens’ Father and mother, they are not in the church. At night I reorganized the Relief Society here.

Frederikshavn April 23 I and Axel Andreasen and Fredrick Sorensen went boating. The wind was blowing and went out in the harbor entrance. The boat jumped nicely. Attended Young Mens meeting and reorganized it and after meeting went and baptized 2 girls and confirmed 1, Anna Terese Sorensen.

Frederikshavn April 24 Thursday, I in connection with Axel Andreason left Frederikshavn and went out in the country and saw J.C. Jensen’s father and mother and ate dinner with them and we went and stayed overnight at the Hörmested Sanggergaard [Sundergaarde], there were infidels and nice folks.

Hörmested April 25 Friday, I went and visited J.C. Jensen’s wife’s parents, ate dinner with them. They live in a place called Faaldhuse I went from there to Sindal and took the train for Ålborg and arrived there 7 pm and then I visited Jensens in Molle.

Ålborg April 26 Saturday, I visited all day.

Ålborg April 27 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and a teacher’s meeting where we transacted some business pertaining to the school and then attended meeting again at 2 pm and 6:30 pm.

Ålborg April 28 I and Elders Nielsen and Christensen were called to Nibe to administer to a sister there that was very sick.

Nibe April 29 We administered to Sister Jensen again. The doctors were surprised at the change. I and Elder Nielsen walked back to Ålborg, a distance of 14 miles and arrived at 12:30 pm. We were very tired then we visited Sister Hansens for supper and spent the evening.

Ålborg April 30 I spent all day at the office reading and writing and at night attended Mutual.

Ålborg May 1, 1902 I spent the day writing and conversing on the principles of the gospel and had a good time. At night I and Elder Christensen visited Morten Jensen’s and had a splendid time.

Ålborg May 2 Friday, I visited Markensen Garlikes and Nielsens in Sundergade and at night I visited Christensen in Nörresundby.

Ålborg May 3 Saturday, I went out visiting some of the saints and at night I attended Priesthood Meeting.

Ålborg May 4 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 3 meetings.

Ålborg May 5 Monday, I had a busy day getting the emigration of Elder Christen Petersen went home.

Ålborg 1902, May 6 Tuesday, I received 4 letters and wrote to my dear ones at home.

Ålborg May 7 Wednesday, I attended M.I.A meeting and visited a little. 2 new Elders came, Mitchell and Nielsen.

Ålborg May 8 Thursday, I went to Olsens to dinner and in the afternoon I went to the madanagre [menagerie?].

Ålborg May 9 Friday, I worked at the books all day and went out to the Vejgård at night and visited Christen Larsen and family.

Ålborg May 10 Saturday, I visited a little.

Ålborg May 11 Sunday, I went to Brönderslev and attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and reorganized the branch and put Brother Steenhouse in to preside.

Ålborg May 12 I wrote 1 letter to Joseph Baker and visited the Sundergade people and also Peter Olsen in the Tenedladen and they asked for baptism and we had a good chat all around.

Ålborg May 13 Tuesday, I wrote all day as I had got so far behind with my work.

Ålborg May 14 Wednesday, I and James Christensen spent the day sightseeing as he came to see me before he returned home. We attended meeting at night.

Ålborg May 15 Thursday, I went to the train in the morning and said good by to James Christensen and wrote a letter to my wife and in the afternoon I visited Ingebor Olsen and administered to her and she was instantly healed. At night I visited Christen Petersen in Christengade and they gave me 2 Kr. I had a good chat there.

Ålborg May 16 Friday, I went to Lögedgade and ate dinner with Fisher Nielsen and visited Sister Olga Rumar and saw her brand new baby and I went to Frederikshavn to grnns [Branch] meeting, arrived there at 8 pm.

Frederikshavn 1902, May 17 Saturday, I visited Taylor Jacobsen and also Miss Andersen and arranged for their baptism.

Frederikshavn May 18 Sunday, I got up at 5:30 am and went to the Kattegat [section of Baltic Sea] and baptized Hans Christen Christensen and I confirmed Marcus Peter Jacobs and Karen Kristine Andersen and then attended Sunday School and two meetings, and after meeting I and Axel J. Andreasen and Elder Mitchell and 24 others went and baptized 3 persons; Sisters Jacobsen and Andersen and Brother Jacobsen and we had a good time. I ate diner with Brother Petersen.

Frederikshavn May 19, 1902 I and Elders Andreasen and Mitchell blessed 8 of Brother Jacobsen’s and Andersen’s children and I left for Ålborg at 10:30 and arrived at 2 pm and attended meeting at night.

Ålborg May 20 I wrote a letter to my wife and visited Brother Andres Petersen who was sick. He took suddenly sick in meeting.

Ålborg May 21 Wednesday, I and Elder Nielsen went over to Sister Larsen’s to dinner and at night I attended meeting and had a hot discussion with Josephite Preacher.

Ålborg May 22 Thursday, I studied in the forenoon and the afternoon I went tracting. I distributed 50 tracts and visited 30 strange houses and at night I visited Olsens in Tenedladen and appointed the night for them to be baptized in.

Ålborg May 23 Friday, I visited 6 families of saints and had good time.

Thisted May 24 I left Ålborg at 11:50 for Thisted and arrived there at 6 pm and met Elder Sorensen at the docks and then visited 3 strange houses.

Thisted May 25, 1902 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and meeting in Thisted and spoke in both and had a good time. Or-dained Casper-sen to a priest.

Thisted May 26,   1902 Monday, I visited 6 families here and instructed them in the gospel. Elder Sorensen was with me all day. At night we visited Olsens in Skjoldborg and got home at 12:30 midnight.

Lögstör May 27 I wrote a letter to my wife and visited a few    families and at night I attended a birthday party for Brother Kaspersens.

Lögstör May 28 Wednesday, I and Elder Fjelsted visited Smade Larsens in Malle and at night I visited Knudsens and had a good time with them.

Nibe May 29 I and Fjelsted walked from Lögstör to Nibe and visited 3 families on the way. We got quite tired.

Ålborg May 30 Visited back in Nibe and then went to Ålborg at night.

Ålborg May 31 Saturday, I visited around Ålborg and did some writing and at night I attended priesthood meeting.

Ålborg 1902, June 1 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 8 meetings and ate supper at Valdemar Petersen’s and after the night meeting I visited Sister Larsens in Helgolandsgade and spent a pleasant evening conversing on the principles of the gospel.

Ålborg June 2 Monday, I and Elder Christensen and Neilsen visited Taylor Petersen’s and spent a fine day with them.

Ålborg June 3 Thursday, I wrote letters all day and at night I visited Sister Christensen’s and preached the gospel to her and warned her of what would befall her if she did not repent and I also attended Relief Society meeting.

Ålborg June 4 I was not well I sat around the house all day and in the evening I attended Y.M.M.I.A.

Ålborg June 5 Thursday, Grundlovs [Constitution] day, we all spent the day out in Blik Celden, a fine grove, and played games and had a fine picnic and at night I and Elders Neilsens and Larsen spent the evening with the Adventists.

Ålborg June 6 Friday, I and Elder Nielsen went over to Nörresundby and visited Sister Larsen. I was so stiff from running the day before that I could hardly walk.

Ålborg June 7 Saturday, I studied all day. I was so sore I could hardly walk so I did not go out much.

Ålborg June 8 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and went and ate supper with Sister Hansen and we had a good time.

Ålborg June 9 Monday, I and Elder Christensen visited Garliks and ate dinner with them and in the afternoon we visited Nielsens and 2 of their daughters and ate supper with Peter Olsen in Tenedladen.

Ålborg 1902, June 10 I wrote some letters and read the papers and in the afternoon I visited Olsens in Louisegade and at night I and Elder Christensen went to a Circus. It cost us 14¢ each.

Ålborg June 11 Wednesday, I was in the office all day writing letters and conversing with strangers on the principles of the gospel and attended meeting at night.

Ålborg June 12 Thursday, I went tracting I visited 39 houses and gave away 55 tracts and one book and in the afternoon I visited Christen Petersen and Ander Petersen in Christensgade and at night Morten Jensens.

Ålborg June 13 Friday, I and Elder Christensen visited Daucals 8 miles out of town we had a enjoyable time.

Ålborg June 14 Saturday, I visited Sister Jensen in Malegade. She was sick in bed. At night Christensen and I went and administered to Sister Mary Jensen.

Ålborg 1902 June 15 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and went and ate supper with Sister Hansen.

Ålborg 16 Monday, I and Elder Christensen visited Anders Petersen. His wife was sick from the effect of having her teeth taken out and at night we visited Brother Peter Olsens and ate supper with them.

Ålborg June 17 Tuesday, I and Elder Christensen visited Christen Larsens in Rurdal. We had a pleasant chat with them and we came home and wrote a letter in the evening.

Ålborg June 18 Wednesday, I visited Christen Petersen and spent a pleasant afternoon conversing on the principles of salvation and on the goodness of God to His people and then I visited Anders Petersen and Marie Jensen and had a pleasant chat with them and then came home and attended Y.M.A.

Ålborg 1902, June 19 In the morning James Nielsen from Brigham City came to labor in our Conference and later in the day I visited the Adventists and Sister Jensens and then spent the remainder of the day studying and chatting.

Ålborg June 20 I and Elder Nielsen went over to Sundby and visited Sister Larsen and I went tracting in the afternoon and visited 30 strange houses and gave away 50 tracts and at night I visited Photograph Larsen and ate supper with him and then spent the evening with him singing and chatting.

Ålborg June 21 Saturday, I stayed in the house all day reading and writing. I also went to Ingebor Olsen’s to a birthday party and went buggy riding.

Ålborg June 22 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and then went out in the grove at night.

Ålborg June 23 I visited a family by the name of Hammers and administered to their little daughter and had a chat with them on the principles of the gospel and at night I and 6 Elders and saints went up on the Skance hill to see the campfires burn in remembrance of the burning of the witches in olden days.

Ålborg June 24 Tuesday, I wrote letters all day. At night I visited Hammers and chatted with them explaining the necessity of complying with the first principles of the gospel.

Ålborg June 25 Wednesday, I visited Backs and went and looked at a little church so I could report it when I got to Copenhagen for conference.

Ålborg June 26 Thursday, I went tracting all day and I visited some of the saints and had a good time with them.

Ålborg June 27 Friday, I visited Sister Jensen’s and administered to her and then visited Morten Jensen in Rosenlunden and they were not home. Then I went out to the grove.

Ålborg June 28 Saturday, I read the paper all day and went swimming in the Limfjorden in the evening.

Ålborg June 29 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and spoke. In the evening I ate supper with Sister Hansen and dinner with Pusser Petersen and breakfast with Sister Frestrups.

Ålborg June 30 Monday, I worked at the books all day and making out reports.

Ålborg July 1 Tuesday, I went out bathing and then worked at the reports until 2 pm and then I packed my valise and got ready to go to Copenhagen. I and 13 other Elders started for Copenhagen on the steamer Zimbera. We were sailing all night got there 7:15 am. I was a little sea sick.

Copenhagen July 2 Wednesday, I rented a room in hotel Miers. I visited around town some and slept some and went to the circus at night.

Copenhagen July 3 Thursday, I went to Sankt Pauls Gade to the headquarters and gave in my report and ate dinner there and then I went and spent the afternoon with Aunt Ellen Kirstene, mother’s sister, and her 3 daughters, Mary, Jenssena, and Christan and Christina’s mom and her 2 children, Aunt was very sick with rheumatism.

Copenhagen July 4 Friday, I went to the R.R. station to meet Sister and Brother Peterson from Ålborg and then I went and visited cousin Lars S. Neilsen and had a fine chat with him and then I went and visited cousin Anna, father’s brother’s youngest daughter. She gave me dinner but did not ask me to come again. She is a hard case. At night I attended the dedication of the conference house in the city, Apostle Lyman offering the prayer.

Copenhagen July 5 Saturday, I attended 2 Priesthood meetings and listened to some good instruction from Apostle Lyman and other Brethren. They were timely and would do all good that will put them into practice. I visited Tivoli in the evening and had a ride on the ruts Bane.

Copenhagen July 6 Sunday, I attended 3 meetings and had a fine time, Brother Lyman speaking most of the time.

Copenhagen July 7 Monday, I attended 2 Priesthood meetings and all the elders spoke a short time. I ate dinner with Aunt Elen and attended concert at night and then we visited at the hotel.

Copenhagen July 8 Tuesday, I went to Sankt. Pauls Gade and chatted with Brother Skanchy and the Elders and then I went to meeting. I had a fine time. I also went to the station to meet Sister Susa Y. Gates. She came over to hold a woman’s congress.

Copenhagen July 9 Wednesday, I visited Aunt Elen and had a fine chat with her and then Elder A. F. Andreason went to Hilleröd and Fred G. Neusen met us at the station. He took us through the park and the King’s garden. We ate supper with Sister Meda Jensen.

Hilleröd July 10 Thursday, I and Andreasen went through the Frederiksborg Slot [Castle], a building that was built in the year 1500 and must have cost $50,000,000. It is surrounded with water and a wall straight up 12 feet high. There was one room that cost Kr 6m. just for furnishing and the building had about 100 rooms. I went from there to Hundested and slept at Aunt Bodel’s place. She is father’s brother’s daughter.

Hundested July 11 Friday, I went and spent the day with Jens Jorgensen, father’s brother’s, son and I also went to Lynæs and at night I slept at Aunt Anna’s, father’s brother’s daughter.

Hundested July 12 Saturday, I visited Niels Larsen. His wife is mother’s cousin. I ate dinner and supper there and I visited Hans Nielsen, his wife also being mother’s cousin.

Hundested July 13 Sunday, I went from Hundested to Kikhavn and visited cousin Peter Larsen and slept there Sunday night.

Monday 14 I visited Jens Jensen, Jens Elisaeussen’s son. Jens Elisaeussen was Father’s cousin and I went and asked the priest for the hall to hold meeting in and got it for Tuesday night. Then I visited cousin Bodel and her daughter Mary and cousin Jens and the Hans Neilsen and then went to cousin Peter’s and accompanied his daughters Tren and Hanna to the lighthouse, Sjos Bjer [Spodsbjerg] lighthouse, and I also had the pleasure of going through the house my parents built in Hundested, one of the first houses built there.

Hundested July 15 Tuesday, I visited Jens Jensen and his children being my second cousins, their father and mother being cousins. I spent a pleasant forenoon with them and then I visited Niels Larsen, his wife being my second cousin, her father and my father being cousins. Then in the afternoon I visited Jens Jergensen, him and mother were second cousins. Then I held a meeting in the mission house. There were 18 present, mostly relatives. I slept at cousin Bodel’s again.

Hundested July 16 I got up early and went and bid cousin Jens and his family goodby and cousin Anna and cousin Bodel and cousin Peter kissed me goodby and cried when I left him. I went to Frederiksværk with the day wagon and from there with the train I arrived in Copenhagen at 3:50.

Copenhagen July 17 Thursday, I went to the archives and made arrangements to get my genealogy and then I spent the day with Cousin Peter’s girls, Laura and Mary. I had a fine time but they don’t care much for the gospel. We took a boat ride on the seas in Copenhagen.

Copenhagen July 18 Friday, I visited the brethren in Sankt Paules Gade in the forenoon and took my things to the Hotel and then I visited Aunt Elen’s and her family and spent a pleasant afternoon with them.

Ålborg July 19 Saturday, I arrived home in Ålborg from Copenhagen. I spent the day reading letters and papers.

Ålborg July 20 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings. I ate dinner at Sister Garlick and supper with Sister Hansen.

Ålborg July 21 Monday, I visited Sister Jensen and Anders Petersen. I confirmed Carl Swiest Jensen.

Ålborg July 22 Tuesday, I got a letter from home and I went over to Sundby and I also visited Mortensens and Neilsen.

Ålborg July 23 Wednesday, I and Elder Neilsen went and took dinner with the Sundergade people and attended meeting.

Ålborg July 24, Thursday, I and Elder Neilsen went to Lögstör to hold meeting, arriving there at 9:30 am and in the forenoon we had a fine time with Knudsens.

Lögstör July 25 Friday, I visited Madam Knudsen and had a fine chat with them and at night I attended meeting. I had a good time visiting old friends in Lögstör. I ate red mush and spent the evening in Knudsens. There were 2 of their nieces there, fine young ladies. We enjoyed ourselves.

Thisted July 26 Saturday, I and Elders Neilsen, Tyested and Nilson went boating and then went back to Knudsens and had a fine chat with Olelia and Anna Lund and then took the steamer at 4 pm for Thisted and arrived there at 7 pm. Emma Knudsen came to the docks and bade us goodby.

Thisted July 27 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and spoke in school and after school all the saints went to Sjörring for an outing. We had a fine time. We had a picnic and sang songs and came back to Thisted at night and held meeting. I spoke 40 minutes and after meeting we chatted a while and had a good time together.

Thisted July 28 Monday, I and Elder Sorensen and Neilsen went to Skolgborg [Skjoldborg]. We had 5 miles to walk in rain and heavy windstorm. We stayed there conversing on the gospel and eating currents until 6 pm. Then we walked back to Thisted and visited Sister and Brother Thomsens and Sister Caspersens as Brother Caspersen is on the back track and is very dark.

Thisted July 29 I visited 4 families through the day and at night I visited Caspersens but did not find them home. Then I attended Relief Society Meeting and talked to the sisters in Thisted and Sister Larsen gave chocolate.

Ålborg July 30 I and Elder Nielsen left Thisted for Ålborg arriving there at 3 pm and at night I attended YMIA.

Ålborg July 31 I did some writing and I visited Skuder Petersen and ate supper with them at night. I’ve had hell in camp, the devil raged.

Ålborg Aug 1, 1902 I visited Andre Petersen and wrote 3 letters and read all day and conversed on the gospel.

Ålborg Aug 2 I made out the report and read some and went to the harbor and bid Sister Gadesen farewell and attended priesthood meeting.

Ålborg Aug 3 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and I and Elder Clarence Neilsen went to Garlicks to dinner and I went to hear the music on Skovbacken. There were 7 Elders in town as it was fast day and branch meeting.

Ålborg Aug 4, 1902 Monday, I studied all day and I received a letter from my wife with a fifty dollar draft in it.

Ålborg Aug 5 Tuesday, I and Elder Nephi Nielsen went to Rurdall to visit Christen Larsens and they were not home so we tracted the town. I visited 39 houses and gave away 45 tracts and 7 Books and had 6 conversations.

Ålborg Aug 6, 1902 I visited Neilsens in Lucky street [Lökkegade] and Ingebor Olsen’s and had a fine time. At night I attended Young Men’s meeting and spoke in meeting. C.P. Christensen’s cousin came in on the Express train and we had a fine chat about home.

Ålborg Aug 7 Wednesday, I visited several of the saints and I conversed until half past 12 last night on the gospel plan and had a time of rejoicing.

Ålborg Aug 8 I wrote all day and went out in the park at night to hear the band play.

Ålborg Aug 9 I and Elder Nephi Nielsen went out to Godthåb and visited Brother Dausel’s folks and we walked back a distance of 10 miles.

Ålborg Aug 10 Sunday, I took the 9 am train to Brönderslev. There I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and we organized a Relief Society. I ate dinner with Sister Jensen and returned on the midnight train.

Ålborg Aug 11 Monday, I looked over the statement and computed accounts and visited the park as there was a big doings there.

Ålborg Aug 12 Tuesday, I received a letter from my dear wife and daughter and also the news and I spent the forenoon reading and in the afternoon I visited a few families. At night I was called on to administer to Sister Neilsen.

Ålborg Aug 13 Wednesday, I visited Olsens Louisegade and had a fine time explaining the truths of the everlasting gospel to them and went and visited the faithful in Sundergade.

Ålborg Aug 14 I visited Backgords and had a fine time explaining the gospel to them. They are relatives of Fjelsteds and we did not get anything to eat because we would not drink ___.

Ålborg Aug 15 I read the scriptures and wrote a letter to my wife and daughter, Edna, and visited some.

Ålborg Aug 16 Saturday, I read some and got ready to go to Frederikshavn and when I was on the steps to go I met Ceina Andersen from Nibe. She had come in to get baptized and wanted me to perform the ordinance. So I put off going to Frederikshavn until morning. At 10:30 pm I baptized her.

Frederikshavn Aug 17 Sunday, I left Ålborg at 5:40 am for Frederikshavn and arrived there at 9:45 am. Found the brethren well and then attended Sunday School and Priesthood meeting and 2 general meetings and a special priesthood meeting where we ordained 8 to the priesthood. I ordained Christen Christensen to the office of teacher. I ate dinner with Stonecutter Petersens.

Frederikshavn Aug 18 Monday, I visited around among the saints. I did nothing of any importance.

Frederikshavn Aug 19 I visited 4 families and then ate dinner at N.S. Petersens and attended meeting at night.

Frederikshavn Aug 20 I visited 5 families and ate dinner at Mortensen’s and had 2 gospel conversations.

Ålborg Aug 21 Thursday, I visited a few saints and wrote some letters.

Aug 22 Friday, I got the emigration blanks ready and sent them to Copenhagen and then went and administered to Anders Petersen and then went to Marten Jensens and spent the evening conversing on the gospel and had a fine time.

Ålborg Aug 23 Saturday, I read the news and the bible all day.

Ålborg Aug 24 Sunday, I attended meeting and Sunday School all day and had several gospel conversations and a good time in general.

Ålborg Aug 25 Monday, I and Elder Fugal went and blessed Aulga Römer’s baby boy, I being mouth. His name was Hans Christen Römer, then I went and visited Olsen’s in Louisegade.

Ålborg Aug 26 Tuesday, C.P. Christensen and Neilsen ate dinner out to Andres Petersen and in the afternoon visited Har Olsen in Lovese gade [street] and had a fine gospel chat there.

Ålborg Aug 27 Wednesday, I and Elder Christensen visited Backgaard and conversed with him about by a church and we also visited Andersens in Denmarks gade [street] and attended meeting at night.

Ålborg Aug 28, Thursday, There was a new Elder come and caught us in bed by the name of Olaf Petersen and during the day we visited Olsens in Louisegade [street] and at night John P. Olsen and James Nielsen from Brönderslev came in sick.

Ålborg Aug 29 Friday, I and Elder C.P.C. went over to Norsunby [Nörresundby] and visited the Croer [Inn] man Andreasen and had a fine gospel talk with his wife then we visited Norstrup. We visited 2 families and ate supper at Brother Christensen’s.

Aug 30 Ålborg I and A.F. Andreasen fixed up the Book act and ran around town a little together and he went to Brönderslev.

Ålborg Aug 31 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and I ate dinner with Neilsens in Sunder gade [street] and supper with Klitgaards.

Ålborg Sept 1 Monday, I and Elder Christensen went over to Norsunby [Nörresundby] and ate dinner with Sister Larsen and had a gospel conversation with her grown daughter.

Ålborg Sept 2 Tuesday, I went out to Olsen’s and then spent a little time reading and got a letter from home and all was well.

Ålborg Sept 3 Wednesday, I visited Olsen’s again and also Sister Petersen and at night I attended meeting.

Ålborg Sept 4 I visited Christen Petersen and ate dinner with them and after dinner I visited Andreas Petersen and at night I visited Olsen’s and spent the evening with them. It is Ingebor’s farewell party. We had a fine time talking gospel and singing hymns.

Ålborg Sept 5 Friday, I went to the harbor and bought some apples and then went to Rurdall and visited Christen Larsen’s.

Ålborg Sept 7 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 3 meetings and Elder Fugal was going home. He and Elder Stenhouse took up the time and I blessed Thomas Marksen’s little girl. I gave her the name of Edna Alfreda and I also ordained John Olsen to the office of a teacher.

Ålborg Sept 8 Monday, I went out to Ingerborg Olsen’s and helped her get her trunk ready for emigrating and went and ate supper with Anders Petersen and was busy all day getting the things ready for the emigrants as Elder Fugal, Ingerborg Olsen, Marie Jensen and Otelia Sorensen left us for Utah. They left Aalborg [Ålborg] at 8:32 pm.

Ålborg Sept 10 Wednesday, I and Elder Winfred Fjelsted went to Nibe. We visited all the saints and visited 2 strange places and administered to Sister Andersen and Sister Jensen and on the way home we called on Dausels and spent a pleasant hour.

Ålborg Sept 11 Thursday, I visited Ålborg and tended James Nielsen who was sick.

Ålborg Sept 12 Friday, I attended the sick man and in the evening I took a stroll around town.

Ålborg Sept 13 Saturday, I wrote all day and attended the sick man. I made him some beef soup and read the news some and ate supper at Andersen’s.

Ålborg Sept 14 Sunday, I got up early and went to Brönderslev and attended Branch meeting. I attended Sunday School and 3 meetings and had a good time with the Elders. We had a good meeting with a lot of strangers.

Ålborg Sept 15 Monday, I returned home from Brönderslev and found James Nielsen very sick and as he had been administered several times without much effect, I sent for the doctor. He said he was very sick but not dangerously.

Ålborg Sept 16 Tuesday, Elder Nielsen is a little better. I visited 5 families and I also received a letter from my wife and 2 from Elder Skanchy, one containing a release for Parley Petersen.

Ålborg Sept 17 Wednesday, I went tracting. I visited 41 houses and gave away 63 tracts and 4 books and visited Olsens and Petersens and attended YMMIA.

Ålborg Sept 18 Thursday, I and Elder Nielsen went over to Lindholm to find one of his uncles but could not. We came back and attended singing practice.

Ålborg Sept 19 Friday, I wrote a letter to my wife and went out tracting in the afternoon. I visited 20 houses and gave away 2 books and 36 tracts.

Ålborg Sept 20 Saturday, I attended Brother Nielsen all day, he being sick in bed and at night I went to Frederikshavn arriving there at 11 pm.

Frederikshavn Sept 21 I attended Sunday School and two meetings and 1 priesthood meeting and there were 2 girls cut off for fornication.

Frederikshavn Sept 22 Monday, I sat in the house all day chatting with and doctoring Elder A.F. Andreasen and at night I returned to Ålborg.

Ålborg Sept 23 Tuesday, I went over to Sundby and took Elder Jensen, who just came, to take him to get a suit of clothes. I also attended meeting at night.

Ålborg Sept 24 Wednesday, I sat up with C.C.Larsen and attended meeting at night.

Ålborg Sept 25 I and Elder Christensen visited Hobro and then went to True and held meeting. There were 25 strangers and we had a good meeting. We ate supper to Madam Holts and also stayed there overnight. She treated us fine and she also paid for the hall, 4 kroner [crowns].

Lögstör Sept 26 Friday, I and Elder Christensen walked from True to Döstrup station and went from there to Lögstör. We found Elder Fjelsted feeling fine and we visited in the afternoon with Madam Knudsen.

Lögstör Sept 27 Saturday, We spent the day in Lögstör and took the steamer at night to Thisted arriving there at 9 pm. There was supper awaiting us at Sister Mette Jensen’s.

Thisted Sept 28 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and one meeting and had a fine time. Had a good meeting. There were 9 strangers.

Thisted Sept 29 Monday, I spent most of the day talking over the affairs of the Branch. I and Elder Christensen went to Thomsen’s for dinner and to Caspersen’s for supper. We had for dinner, black bread and salt herring. We spent a nice evening together.

Limfjorden Sept 30 Tuesday, I and Elder Christensen went on board steamer at 6 am and started for Lögstör but a fog raised and we had to anchor and lay anchored for 6 hours. Then the fog raised and we went to Nyköbing and we went uptown and bought some cakes and went from there to Lögstör arriving there at 6 pm. We spent the evening with Knudsens. We spent a fine evening.

Nibe Oct 1 Wednesday, I and Elders Fjeldsted and Christensen walked from Lögstör to Nibe. We bought a bottle of port wine and some ginger cakes on the way, the only thing we could get to sustain life with and we stayed at Hotel Pheonix.

Ålborg Oct 2 Thursday, I arrived home from my trip around the Conference. I came from Nibe today.

Ålborg Oct 3 Friday, I went and had a bath and worked at the books and went out visiting in the afternoon and went over to Nörresundby in the evening.

Ålborg Oct 4 Saturday, I wrote all day.

Ålborg Oct 5 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 3 meetings and ate dinner at Garlick’s and supper at Sister Hansen’s.

Ålborg Oct 6 Monday, I attended Neilsen most of the day and did a little visiting around town and got the emigrants off. Also Elder Parley Petersen of over at Bear Lake started for home.

Ålborg Oct 7 Tuesday, I and Elder Andreasen visited Markensens and Petersens and at night attended womens meeting.

Ålborg Oct 8 Wednesday, I visited around town some and had a long chat with some inter mission girls and I think one with a mormon.

Ålborg Oct 9 I am put in mind of that it is two years today since I left Salt Lake City for my mission. I bade my wife and little Floyd and Hazel goodbye. I tell you I felt sad. I visited Olsens and had a good gospel chat and I ate dinner with Sister Larsen and she gave me a glass bowl.

Ålborg Oct 10 Friday, I visited around town a little with Elder Andreasen.

Ålborg Oct 11 Saturday, I wrote a letter to my dear ones at home.

Ålborg Oct 12 Sunday, I went to Brönderslev and attended Sunday School and 3 meetings.

Brönderslev Oct 13 Monday, I visited Stock Christina and ate dinner with her and then I went to the market and visited 3 other families. I also blessed a baby.

Brönderslev Oct 14 Tuesday, I came home from Brönderslev and spent the day visiting.

Ålborg Oct 15 Wednesday, I visited Brother Petersen and at night I attended YMIA and after meeting I baptized a woman in a full rainstorm. Her name was Ane Johanne Petersen.

Oct 16 Thursday, I was sick in bed all day.

Ålborg Oct 17 Friday, Sick in bed.

Ålborg Oct 18 Saturday, sick.

Ålborg Oct 19 Sunday, Sick. but attended Sunday School and meetings and went and ate a little dinner with Taylor Petersen and spent a couple of hours with Olsens in Louisegade [street] and went up to Sister Hansen’s after night meeting.

Ålborg Oct 20 Monday, I was in the house all day reading a little as I was not quite well. I went and said farewell to Bodel Andersen.

Ålborg Oct 21 Tuesday, not well. Spent the day indoors. I also got a letter from home. I spent the day reading. At night I attended baptisms and I did the confirming. It was Elder N.M. Nielsen’s cousin Jergina Pedersen.

Ålborg Oct 22 Wednesday, I visited Olsens in Louisegade [street] and attended meeting at night.

Ålborg Oct 23 Thursday, I went tracting and visited 25 houses and in the afternoon I visited Taylor Petersen’s and preached all the afternoon and evening to his hired girls.

Ålborg Oct 24 Friday, I went out tracting. I distributed 55 tracts and gave away 3 books and had a general good time. I visited Andersen’s at night.

Ålborg Oct 25 Saturday, I wrote a letter to my wife and read the news all day.

Ålborg Oct 26 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and at night I went to Sister Hansens for supper.

Ålborg Oct 27 Monday, I visited a few of the saints and tried to cheer them a little and at night I visited John Olsen.

Ålborg Oct 28 Tuesday, I and Elder Christensen went over to Nörresundby and I ate dinner at Valdemar Petersen’s and attended Relief Society Meeting.

Ålborg Oct 29 Wednesday, I visited Olsens in Louisegade [street] and had a fine chat with them.

Ålborg Oct 30 Thursday, I got up early and we cleared all the benches out of the hall so it could be whitewashed and then I went tracting. I visited 26 houses and gave away 35 tracts and had 1 gospel conversation.

Ålborg Oct 31 Friday, We cleaned house all day. Worked til 12 at night.

Ålborg Nov 1 Saturday, Cleaned house again. It is just 2 years since I came to the city of Ålborg.

Ålborg Nov 2 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and ate supper with Trestips and spent the evening.

Ålborg Nov 3 Monday, Went to Sondergade [street] to dinner and in the afternoon I and Elder Larsen visited Mary Jensen and in the evening I went to Klitgards and ate supper and spent the evening.

Ålborg Nov 4 Tuesday, I and Elder Nielsen went and administered to Mary Jensen and ate dinner with Sister Larsen and attended meeting at night.

Ålborg Nov 5 Wednesday, I visited S. Petersen and visited Maren Jensens and had a fine time and at night I attended meeting.

Ålborg 1902, Nov 6 I wrote a letter to my wife and son, Louis. In the afternoon I visited 3 girls by invitation and had a good time with them and explained the gospel to them and I think were hard nuts.

Ålborg Nov 7 I visited Christen Larsens in Revidal and then went to Sister Christensen’s and drank cocoa. I also got weighed. I weigh 218 lbs.

Ålborg Nov 8 Saturday, I was busy getting the emigration blanks off. At night I went to Frederikshavn, arriving there at 7 pm. A.L.A. met me at the depot.

Frederikshavn Nov 9 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 3 meetings and cut one girl off the Church.

Ålborg Nov 10 I left Frederikshavn at 6 am and came home to Ålborg stopping at Brönderslev on the way. When I arrived in Ålborg I had to go to bed for I was sick.

Ålborg Nov 11 Tuesday, sick all day.

Ålborg Nov 12 Wednesday, I spent the day fixing up for Conference. Attended meetings atnight.

Ålborg Nov 13 Thursday, I worked at the books and reports getting them ready for conference.

Ålborg Nov 14 Friday, I spent most of the day working at the book preparing for conference. A.L. Mortensen came up and paid me a visit and spent conference with us.

Ålborg Nov 15 Saturday, visited around Ålborg with Elder Mortensen and at night at 8 our conference commenced. Pres. Skanchy and Andrew Jensen came at 9. We had a fine meeting.

Ålborg Nov 16 Sunday, I attended 3 meetings, 2 of them at the hall in Hotel Matinas.

Ålborg Nov 17 Monday, We held 2 priesthood meetings and a Relief Society meeting at night and had a time of rejoicing together.

Ålborg Nov 18 Tuesday, Pres. Skanchy went over to Sundby to Sister Larsen’s and ate dinner and at night we held branch meeting and sustained all the branch officers.

Ålborg Nov 19 Wednesday, I and Skanchy and Mortensen went to Frederikshavn and held meeting at night.

Ålborg Nov 20 Thursday, I and Pres. Skanchy, Jensen Mortensen and Petersen took a run up to Skagen, a city on the north end of Denmark, the place where I labored first in Denmark, it being a place of note. Then I came home and attended the Bazaar. We had a fine time. We took in 60 Kr [crown] for the Sisters.

Ålborg Nov 21 I rested up all day and wrote a letter to my dear ones.

Ålborg Nov 22 Saturday, I wrote reports and straightened up my books.

Ålborg Nov 23 Sunday, I attended 2 meetings and visited Olsens in Louisegade [street].

Ålborg Nov 24 Monday, I visited around town and in the evening I wrote.

Ålborg Nov 25 Tuesday, I wrote all day and spent the evening at Louisegade [street] conversing on the gospel.

Ålborg Nov 26 Wednesday, I visited Sister Nielsen and tried to comfort her as she had lost her husband. Attended meeting at night.

Ålborg Nov 27 Thursday, I and Elder Christensen made up the statistical report for the last 12 months ending Nov 30 and I did some writing.

Ålborg Nov 28 Friday, I wrote a letter and in the afternoon Elders Nielsen, Christensen and I went out to Godthåb and paid Brother and Sister Dauser a visit; returning at 1 pm.

Ålborg Nov 29 Saturday, I wrote 2 letters and did some visiting and at 9 pm went to Frederikshavn, arriving there at 11 pm.

Frederikshavn Nov 30 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and meeting and a wedding, Brother Christensen and Sister Splg [?], bride and groom.

Frederikshavn Dec 1 Monday, I got up early and took the express to Hjörring and ate breakfast with Elder Larsen and Petersen and then took the afternoon train to Brönderslev and stopped there awhile and then took the night train to Ålborg and found Brother Christensen there. We had a fine chat about home and its affairs.

Ålborg Dec 2 Tuesday, I chatted all day with Brother Christensen.

Ålborg Dec 3 Wednesday, I did some writing and at night I attended meeting.

Ålborg Dec 4 Thursday, I did some writing and visiting and straightening books.

Ålborg Dec 5 I worked at the report all day.

Ålborg Dec 6 Saturday, I wrote all day and at night I visited some of the saints and had a good gospel chat.

Ålborg Dec 7 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and held 8 meetings and I ate supper at Olsens in Louisegade [street].

Ålborg Dec 8 Monday, I went and ate dinner at Louisegade [street] and I went out to the Rail Road depot it being the first day they have used it. It is a nice depot. There are 50 trains daily.

Ålborg Dec 9 Tuesday I went to Norresundby and visited the Saints there and at night I attended womens meeting.

Ålborg Dec 10 Wednesday I received a letter from home, all was well and fixed up a bill of tracts for Brother L. P. Christensen and visited around town a little and attended meeting at night. The girls all cried because Axel Andreasen preached his farewell sermon.

Ålborg Dec 11 Thursday I got up early and went with L. P. Christensen to the station and then visited around town some and at night I went Norresundby and visited a couple of families and spent a nice evening. We sang and conversed about the gospel.

Ålborg Dec 12 Friday I went tracting and visited 34 houses and gave away 55 tracts and 2 books.

Ålborg Dec 13 I worked at the books all day and settled them up and received the from C. P. Christensen and at night we went to Sundby and ate super with Sister Petersen.

Ålborg Dec 14 I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and Elders Christensen and Nielsen preached their farewell sermon and we had a fine time. There was a house full to talk to.

Ålborg Dec 15 Monday I visited around town with the Elders that were going home. At night I visited Pedersens, Nielsen’s cousins. We held a meeting and had a fine time.

Ålborg Dec 16 Tuesday I got up early and went to the depot and said goodbye to Nielsen and Christensen and then spent the day in loneliness.

Ålborg Dec 17 Wednesday I worked at the book all day straightening the books and at night I attended meeting and received a letter from home.

Ålborg Dec 18 Thursday I went to Sundby and ate dinner with Sister Larsen and at night I visited Sister Petersen and then attended Choir practice.

Ålborg Dec 19 Friday I went tracting. I visited 45 houses and gave away 65 tracts and 4 books and wrote a letter to my wife and
children.

Ålborg Dec 20 Saturday I took the 5:30 train in the morning and went to Thisted. I traveled 14 hours to get 18 miles arriving there at 8 in the evening. Sorensen and Jensen met me at the train.

Thisted Dec 21 Sunday I attended Sunday School and 1 meeting and ate dinner with Caspersens and supper at Johnsons.

Thisted Dec 22 Monday I ate dinner with Sister Petersen and in the evening I visited a family by the name of James Rasmussen and ate 3 meals and spent an enjoyable evening talking about the gospel.

Ålborg 23 Tuesday, I returned to Ålborg from Thisted, spending 14 hours on the way.

Ålborg 24 Wednesday, I spent the day visiting around Ålborg and spent the evening at Brother and Sister Klitgaards. We had a fine time.

Ålborg Dec 25 I wrote a letter to my dear ones and attended the Xmas tree at night had a good time.

Ålborg Dec 26 Friday, I and Elder Fjelsted went to Frederikshavn to attend their tree returning at midnight.

Ålborg Dec 27 Saturday, I got ready to go to Copenhagen and worked some at the books.

Ålborg Dec 28 Sunday, I attended 3 meetings and at night I started for Copenhagen and I arrived there at 2:30 in the morning.

Copenhagen Dec 29 Monday, I visited Pres. Skanchy and Christensen and visited the archives and my aunt and her 2 daughters and had a fine time with them.

Copenhagen Dec 30 Tuesday, I went to Hundested and visited my cousin Bodel and spent the night with them and several others.

Hundested Dec 31 Wednesday, I visited Jens Sorensen in Karlsminde, father’s cousin and cousin Jens and his folks and bid them goodbye and others and had a good time and went and stayed at cousin Peter’s and ate supper.

Jan 1, 1903 Kikhavn, I visited Jens Elisaeussen and 2 of his children and bid them farewell and then went back to cousins Peters and bid them good by. They cried like babies, especially Trine. She wept like her heart was broken. Then I walked to Frederiksværk a distance of 9 miles arriving there 4 pm. Then I visited my cousin Peter who was at his daughter Laura’s and spent the evening.

Jan 2, 1903 Friday, I left Copenhagen for home. I arrived there at 9 pm.

Jan 3 Saturday, I spent making out the monthly report and writing and at night I attended priesthood meeting and cut a woman off the church by the name of Courlena Sorensen.

Ålborg Jan 4 Sunday, I took the early train for Brönderslev and attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and had a time of rejoicing, saying good by to them. I also received a present from Sister Christensen and Eliasen and Jensen.

Ålborg Jan 5 Monday, I visited Sister Larsen in Nörresundby and Sister Petersen in Christensgade [street] and then went to the train and met Olaf Petersen.

Ålborg Jan 6 Tuesday, I worked all day at the financial report and at night I and Fjelsted visited a family by the name of Larsens and had a fine time.

Ålborg Jan 7 Wednesday, I and Olaf Petersen worked at the report.

Ålborg Jan 8 & 9 Thursday and Friday, We also worked at the financial report, never stepping out of the office.

Ålborg Jan 10 Saturday, Before I got out of bed I received a letter from Brother Skanchy with my release in it, but stating I would have to stay a week longer. I visited Olsens in Lousiegade [street], ate dinner with them and had a fine time talking gospel with them.

Ålborg Jan 12 Monday, I returned home from Brönderslev and visited Andersens, Nielsen and Garlicks and Frestrupes and had a time of visiting.

Ålborg Jan 13 Thursday, I and Fjelsted went to Lögstör and visited Knudsens family and had a fine time.

Lögstör Jan 14 Wednesday, I went to Nibe and said farewell to the saints there and visited Dausels in the evening, arriving in Ålborg at 11 pm.

Ålborg Jan 15 Thursday, I visited a few places in Ålborg.

Ålborg Jan 16 Friday, I went to visit having to administer to Jorges Andersen and on the way home I visited Sister Nielsen in Larsens and at night I visited Sister Larsens and preached to them.

Ålborg 1903 Jan 17 Saturday, I took stock and turned everything over to Brother Christensen.

Ålborg Jan 18 Sunday, I and Pres. Christensen went to Frederikshavn. I went and bid them farewell. I attended 2 meetings and Sunday School and had a fine time. The saints all went to the station and bid me farewell. I returned to Ålborg that same night.

Ålborg Jan 19 Monday, I and Elder Christensen went to Vejgårde and visited Brother and Sister Larsens at night. I and Brother Christensen went together.

Ålborg Jan 20 Tuesday, I visited around town a little and bought a satchel and at night I attended womens meeting and talked to them for the last time.

Ålborg Jan 21 Wednesday, I and Elder Fjeldsted visited 6 families and at night I attended YMIA and spoke to them for the last time.

Ålborg Jan 22 Thursday, I visited the saints and bid them goodbye.

Ålborg Jan 23 Friday, I did the same.

Ålborg Jan 24 Saturday, I worked at the books.

Ålborg Jan 25 Sunday, I attended Sunday School and 2 meetings and at night I spent the last night in Ålborg at brother and sister Anders Petersens and had a fine time. I ate dinner at Waltermen [Valdemar] Petersens.

Ålborg Jan 26 I and Elder Larsen left Ålborg for Esbjerg on our journey home. Brother Christensen accompanied us to the above named place.

Esbjerg Jan 27 We took the steamer for Grimsby leaving at 12 noon. We bid B. Mortensen and Christensen good by in a storm and we were on the north sea 40 hours and we had rough voyage. We were all very sick. We arrived in Grimsby on the morning of the 29 and were rushed through post haste. The Californian waiting for us in Liverpool as we were 10 hours late.

Liverpool Jan 29 We set sail at 1 pm in a terrible wind storm but did not get sick.

Jan 30 In the fresh sea feeling fine. Was able to eat breakfast.

Feb 1 Sunday, On the Atlantic going thru what they call the devils hole. The water is going over the boat and the wind is blowing at a terrible rate. Sick in bed.

Feb 2 Monday, better weather. Am well. Can eat my meals.

Feb 3 Well, very stormy.

Feb 4 Wednesday, very stormy.

“ 5 Thursday, “ “

“ 6 Friday, “ “

“ 7 Saturday, quite fine.

“ 8 Sunday, very rough.

“ 9 Monday, “ “

“ 10 Tuesday, “ “

“ 11 Wednesday, fine.

12 Thursday, I arrived at Portland after a 14 day rough voyage. In the afternoon I went to the station and checked my trunk. At night I attended the theatre and then went and slept on the boat.

Feb 13 Friday, At 7 am I left Portland for Boston, arriving there at 10 am. While there I visited Bunker Hill and the Naval yards and I saw the Commonwealth, the boat I crossed over to England on 28 months before. I left there at 1 pm for my westward journey over the Boston and Maine [Railroad name] to Rotterdam [New York] and from there to Buffalo on the West Shore Line and from Buffalo to Chicago on the New York Central. I passed through Cleveland, Ohio at 8 am on Feb 14.

Chapter 1 Source List

Bert N and Anna Christensen Family History Committee.  “Hazel Johnson Christensen,” Hazel and M.J. Christensen and their Children. Salt Lake City, Utah: Privately published, 2007: 145-217.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Early Preston Ward Records. FHL 7,539. (P. 22 Joseph & Julia Roper received 10 May 1885; P. 24 Joseph & Olive Johnson received 18 Jan 1855; P. 26 James & Harriet Johnson received 6 July 1884; P. 27 William & Susie Hawkes received 6 July 1884; all from Hyde Park.)

Daines, Joseph Benjamin. “Joseph Benjamin Daines.” Unpublished manuscript.

Greaves, Harriet Johnson. “Tell It Again.” Unpublished manuscript, undated.

Hart, Newell. Hometown Album: a Pictorial History of Franklin County, Idaho—Horse and Buggy Days and Early Auto Era. Preston, Idaho: Cache Valley Newsletter Publishing Co., 1973.

Hawkes, George Rogers, ed. “Autobiography of William Hawkes, Jr.” and “The Biography of William Hawkes, Sr.,” Family Histories of William Hawkes, Jr. and Anna Rebecca Rogers. Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University Press,  1999.

“History of Lorenzo and Mary Elizabeth Hansen Johnson.” Unpublished manuscript, undated.

Frasier, Jean Brown. “Harriet Johnson Greaves.” Unpublished manuscript, 1981.

Johnson, Harriet E. Various unpublished letters to daughter Hazel Christensen. 1922-1925, Privately held by Joy Stubbs.

Johnson, Howard. “Life Sketch.” Unpublished manuscript, undated.

Johnson, Louis. “Louis Johnson.” Unpublished manuscript, 1957.

Johnson, James. James Johnson Photo Album Ca. 1900-1902.  MSS 2731 L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah.

Johnson, James. Diary, 1900-1902.  Z11/1/D 7 L. Tom Perry Special Collections, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah.

Johnson, James, transcription by Adele Matthews and Annalee Barajas.  James Johnson Missionary Journal, illustrated and edited by William Murri. CD privately produced, 2009.

“Joseph Roper,” Progressive Men of Bannock, Bear Lake, Bingham, Fremont and Oneida Counties, Idaho. Chicago: A. W. Bowen & Co., 1904: 381-383.

Seely, Joyce and Max R. Johnson. James Johnson and Harriet Emmeline Lamb: A Genealogical and Personal History of themselves and their Descendants. Provo, Utah: J. Grant Stevenson, 1967.

Seely, Joyce. James Johnson and Harriet Emaline Lamb. Privately published, January 2004. (Notes and photographs from James Johnson grandchildren: Helen Taylor, Hazel Fisher, Roma, Perry, Shirley Duke, Carol Brown, Calvin Johnson, Jerry Johnson)

Editor’s Note about Illustrations:
Unless otherwise noted, photos, documents and newspaper clippings are from collections in possession of Carol Brown, Joyce Seely, Lesa Bowen, Joy Stubbs and Emily Kitterman. Many photos edited and enhanced by Emily Kitterman and Annalee Barajas.

 



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